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Displaying results 0 - 4 of 4

(2018) Plenty of bangs per buck in this Western Cape Shiraz - though of course those bucks are buying Fairtrade's guarantee of good conditions and a fair wage for the farm workers too. Big, deep and smoky from its six months in oak, there's a chocolate depth and hints of sizzling bacon fat on the nose, before a full, powerful palate, brimming with black fruit and clove spice to deliver one helluva mouthful of wine at the price.
(2016) From vineyards in the Western Cape, a wine that pays homage to the northern Rhône, blending Shiraz (and Mourvèdre) with 2% of the white grape Viognier à la Côte-Rôtie. Despite its 14.5% alcohol it displays a delicate and very attractive floral, white pepper and exotic fruit lift to the darker berry fruit. Unoaked, the palate is all about abundant, buoyant freshness, with plenty of red and black fruits, a juicy acidity and a stripe of tannin and earthy grip that gives broad food-matching appeal too: summer barbecues especially. Until 23rd August its price is £5.49 - the main reason for its Wine of the Week award. Watch the video for more information and food-matching suggestions.
(2016) Also from the Zalze range, a little of the white wine grape Viognier does add some aromatic lift, but its the ripe, dense blueberry and damson fruitiness that drives this, just a sprinkle of white pepper and earthiness, then the palate juicy, creamy and savoury. Oak in the finish is a little charry and chippy, but good fruit and the well-judged level of tannin and acidity make it food-friendly and quaffable.
(2011) 14%. Twelve months in French oak has given a smoky vanilla note to the nose of this wine, with a faintly animal, almost medicinal edge, but also some tight but glossy and ripe red fruits. Quite complex. On the palate the cedar and smoke-touched red fruit dominates, with raspberry and plum flavours having plenty of flesh and sweetness. The creamy tannins and the quality French oak bring coffee and toast, and the pert acidity of the Barbera leaves this sweet and fruity, but tangy and dry too. Match to meatballs in a tomato sauce for a slice of heaven.
Displaying results 0 - 4 of 4