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Displaying results 0 - 10 of 41

(2019) Hampton WaterI have to say upfront that everything about this Pays d'Oc blend of Grenache, Cinsault and Mourvèdre screams 'marketing' - first the ambitious price of £20 per bottle, second the striking label, 'Vinolock' glass stopper and designer bottle, and thirdly that it is made by Gérard Bertrand for a wine company launched by rock star Jon Bon Jovi and his son, Jesse - the business run by 23-year-old Jesse who studied political science and business economics. The 'Hampton' of its name is The Hamptons, and exceedingly up-market coastal playground for New York's super-rich, where the inspiration for making a rosé came to the father and son team. Following booming sales in the US, the wine has recently arrived in the UK. So is it any good? It's from the Languedoc, but pale and Provençal in style, though it has seen seen some barrel ageing which is not typical of Provence. There's a buouancy and fruity lift to the aromas, intense small berries and a limey note. In the mouth no real trace of oak, other perhaps than a richer texture than might be expected, again plenty of concentration of flavour, and a salty lick of minerality to join the pithy lemon zest acidity. It's certainly a bigger mouthful of wine than a typical Provence example, and has enough going on to justify the hype, though no doubt a bit of celebrity factor is built into the price.
(2019) The Sauvignon Gris that lies behind this pale blush wine is immediately apparent on the nose and palate; tasted blind one might have guessed Sauvignon Blanc, with its racy acidity, grapefruity tang and touches of elderflower and passion fruit. Not a remarkable rosé it's true, but distinctive and quite unusual.
(2019) A blend of Syrah, Grenache and Cinsault, this is a rosé pitched as 'feminine', with its elegant frosted pink glass bottle and glass stopper, pale but bright pink hue and touch of sweetness. It has pleasant downy peach and summer fruit aroma, the palate showing that touch of sugar, though there is acid too, and citrus notes. Something about this did not appeal as much as others in the Foncalieu pink range, maybe just too much of a sweet and sour character. No UK stockist at time of review.
(2019) Cheap rosé in a 250ml ringpull can, a French wine but packaged in Germany. Should we even bother to taste it? Well, the 'single serve' wine and convenience markets are apparently booming with more and more such wines finding shelf space, so although I find the whole presenation particularly dodgy - a lounging, pubescent-looking girl in short shorts adorns the pink can - I decided this is one to be approached with an open mind. The stuff inside is Grenache I believe, and the aromas are gently summery, with berries and light grassiness. The palate is dry and nicely balanced, and in truth the wine is a good quality quaffing rosé. So, with this concept apparently popular, if it works for you, it can be recommeded. Price for the 250ml can. For more information please watch the video.
(2018) From the Languedoc, Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault, Carignan, Merlot and Mourvèdre in the mix for a medium-pale rosé, with a fairly simple and straightforward strawberry and raspberry fruit, the palate fruity and generous, a little briary leafiness and a slightly astringent quality to the acidity stopping it a little short, but keeping it fresh.
(2018) Though the name of the estate sounds like a not so subtle cash-in on Provence, in fact domaine de la Provenquière traces its history back almost 500 years in it's corner of the Languedoc close to Béziers. Having said that, this certainly has Provençal leanings, pale in colour, dry and fresh with only 12% alcohol, though made from the pink-skinned Pinot Gris rather than Provençal varieties. Summer berries, fragrant lemon peel and a little wisp of peach on the nose, then a dry, chalky palate with pleasingly sweet fruit, medium body and then plenty of tangy acid. Daily Drinker club members will pay £9.00 for this.
(2017) Yet another Languedoc pink that's a ringer in colour (and grape blend, 80% Grenache and 20% Syrah) for Provence rosé, but in this case, quite different in character: after a light, summer fresh nose there's real intensity on the palate: more tang and more fruit concentration than most Provence examples, real zip with lemony acidity powering through decisively.
(2017) Another pale wine in the Provençal idiom. this comes from the Languedoc and blends two local grapes to excellent effect. Delicately touched by pink grapefruit, redcurrant and raspberry on the nose, the creamy but light-bodied palate shows more delicate fruit - wild strawberries and raspberries - but a lovely freshness to the acidity to give it a shimmering, lacework finish.
(2017) An organically certified wine from the Côtes de Thongue, this has that pale Provençal colour so unlike the darker, more cherry-coloured Cabernet-based pinks of Bordeaux. It is moderately fruity with small red berries and a touch of lemon, a certain stony mineral character too. In the mouth it is quite full with 13.5% alcohol, and thought juicy, doesn't have enormous length. Good freshness and a bit of melon-rind texture too though.
(2016) This wine will be bottled under screwcap from next vintage, but this was a perfectly clean. Bright pink, cool, with pomegranate and watermelon fruit and dry cherry it has fresh fruit and balance on the palate, and clean, dry acidity too. A succesful Cabernet Sauvignon, Cinsault and Merlot rosé from close to Carcassonne.
Displaying results 0 - 10 of 41