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Displaying results 0 - 6 of 6

(2021) From a domaine that can trace its roots back to 1701, this family-run Languedoc estate near Montpellier blends this wine from Grenache, Rolle and Syrah grown on volcanic soils. Sealed with the 'Vinolok' glass stopper it is a beautifully packaged wine, pale peach in colour with lovely salt and mineral flecks to the red berry and citrus fruit. Bone dry, there's real grip here, pithy citrus and the tang of citrus skins, underpinned by redcurrant and finishing with good definition. Quite a grown-up, serious style at a relatively modest price. Watch the video for more information on this wine.
(2020) Chót, the back label informs me, is the Occitan word for 'owl', often to be found in the trees around the vineyard for this Languedoc rosé.  A pale coppery-pink, it has a super-fruity nose, lots of lift with flowers and vivid cherry and quite exotic hints of almost Turkish-delight character. In the mouth it feels quite substantial: there's a bit of tannic grip, plenty of limey acidity, and the red fruit somewhere between tart berries and softer peach, a hint of sweetness flitting around the finish. £10.80 for Daily Drinker club members.
(2020) From Cinsault vines grown in the Languedoc, this is another pale and Provençal-style rosé, there's a little bit of candy, amylic aroma here from the cold ferment (not uncommon in many of the palest rosés), and then cool and pretty watermelon fruit, touching on peachiness. Good, lemony acidity sharpens up the finish, with sweet small red berries.
(2017) Yet another Languedoc pink that's a ringer in colour (and grape blend, 80% Grenache and 20% Syrah) for Provence rosé, but in this case, quite different in character: after a light, summer fresh nose there's real intensity on the palate: more tang and more fruit concentration than most Provence examples, real zip with lemony acidity powering through decisively.
(2017) An organically certified wine from the Côtes de Thongue, this has that pale Provençal colour so unlike the darker, more cherry-coloured Cabernet-based pinks of Bordeaux. It is moderately fruity with small red berries and a touch of lemon, a certain stony mineral character too. In the mouth it is quite full with 13.5% alcohol, and thought juicy, doesn't have enormous length. Good freshness and a bit of melon-rind texture too though.
(2015) 13% abv. With a 'Vinolock' glass closure, this is a blend of 50% Grenache, 30% Cinsault and 20% Syrah. Dry and subtle, is this too discreet for its own good? Clearly another nod to/cash-in on the Provence popularity, and it does a good job of mimicking the style, but just lacks a bit of Élan at the price.
Displaying results 0 - 6 of 6