(2019) Around the mouth of the River Loire, the slate and granite soils of Muscadet produce wines prized for their freshness and tang. I don't come across too many sub-£6 wines that I can recommend these days, but this is one: it is not a Muscadet 'Sur Lie' so misses some of that yeasty, more saline character, but the fruit is bright and clear, all dry apple and lemon with an apple core bite of dryness to the acidity of the finish making it very seafood and sushi friendly. Watch the video for more information.
(2019) From the original 'cool climate' valley of Chile, Casablanca, where morning mists and proximity to the ocean moderate temperatures, this is lightly-oaked, and spends four months on the lees, giving it breadth and texture and a certain creaminess. Aromatically there's a bit of almost Sauvignon-like passionfruit, peach and notes of more exotic tropical fruits. In the mouth that leesiness gives a mouth-filling texture, and again the fruit is ripe and exotic, with mango and papaya, as well as a grapefruity note that continues into the finish to add a welcome acid counterpoint. Quite long, and a lovely style really, blending ripeness and openness, with a stylish, dry finish. Watch the video for more information and food-matching ideas.
(2019) On New Zealand's North Island, Hawke's Bay has carved out a formidable reputation for Syrah, Bordeaux varieties and Chardonnay, but this is a bit different: made from the grape of Beaujolais, Gamay, partly with carbonic maceration, and only 12.5% alcohol. From what's described as "an incredible vintage," this comes from a vineyard planted in 1995 and has an expressive and varietal nose, crammed with crushed plum and cherry, that hint of watercolour paint-box so typical of Gamay, and a tug of earthy, beetrooty character. In the mouth the fruit ripeness and sweetness is turned up a notch above a typical Beaujolais, vibrant and etched by an agile acidity and bit of tannic grip, it is balanced and delicious. Watch the video for more information and food matching ideas.
(2019) long-gully-semillonIt's a common misconception that Australia is a country with a very young wine industry and, therefore, only very young vines. In fact, vines have been established for almost 200 years, and with Phyloxerra never reaching many vineyards regions it also boasts some of the oldest, still productive, vineyards in the world. The label here declares 'Ancient Vine', and that's no marketing BS: this Semillon vineyard in the Barossa Valley is an astonishing 130 years old. Made by David Franz (son of the legendary Peter Lehmann), it is unoaked, but spent 10 months on the lees in tank to build flavour and texture.


Pale lemon in colour, it opens with notes of lemon jelly and pollen, the bee theme continuing with a touch of beeswax, something a litle creamy too. On the palate it burst with vivacious flavour. There's a surge of lemon - fat and sweet rather than tart and thin - plenty more peach and citrussy, orangey flavours too, and the rich, slightly chewy texture adds to the intrigue. The natural concentration of these old vines is apparent, the intensity never letting up into a long finish, that flits with sweetness, but indeed finishes dry, licked by salt and lemons. This 2015 is listed at Harvey Nichols at time of review though not on their web site, but the 2017 has slightly wider distribution.

(2019) A small proportion of Verduzzo in this blend was fermented in 600-litre French oak and that nutty creaminess comes through, with more subdued pear and a gentle grassy background. The palate has weight and structure, fine fruit sweetness and rich texture, but really fresh acidity that powers the finish.
(2019) From the oldest and largest Bacchus vineyard in England, vines dating back as far as 1977, this is super-fresh, partly due to obvious early-picking given it is more or less dry and only 10.5% alcohol. It's super-aromatic too, flitting around Sauvignon Blanc, Gavi di Gavi and Torrontes, but its own thing too with crunchy pear and citrus, and some nettle and floral notes. In the mouth a touch of spritz, then the sheer acidity drives this, delicate talcumy aromas and flavours persist, that clean, cool pear fruitiness, and zippy acidity to finish. A cracking summer in the garden contender this. £10.80 for Daily Drinker club members. Watch the video for more information.
(2019) The credentials here are solid, from a vineyard adjoining the famous Miraval estate and with winemaking guided by Jean Louis Bavay, who gained his rosé expertise at the legendary Domaine Ott. It's a classic Provence pink, mostly Grenache and Cinsault along with 20% Syrah, about 8% of which is fermented oak. Maybe that gives the little hint of spice on the nose, but it's mostly driven by small red berries - cranberries, redcurrants - watermelon and rose-hips, but there's zestiness too. In the mouth it feels quite substantial, though very crisp and fresh, lots of lemony zip and vigour, a peachy softness to the fruit, but always dry, mouth-watering and food-friendly in style. A fine example of Provence Rosé at a very fair price. Free delivery on 12 bottles. Watch the video for more information and food matching ideas.
(2019) Made from 100% Refosco in the Treviso area, this comes from Masi, best known for their Amarone wines, so it is not surprising to hear around 15% of this undergo appassimento (the grapes dried on straw mats) for approximately 50 days. That gives this wine an extra edge of firmness and a bit of tannic bite too, not sweetness: it has cherry and floral aromas, pretty and peachy, then that firmer edge on the palate, crisp fruit but an apple core bite and squeeze of fresh lemon, to give a clean, savoury and food-friendly finish. There's substance here to stand up to a bowl of tomatoey pasta.
(2019) The Sauvignon Gris that lies behind this pale blush wine is immediately apparent on the nose and palate; tasted blind one might have guessed Sauvignon Blanc, with its racy acidity, grapefruity tang and touches of elderflower and passion fruit. Not a remarkable rosé it's true, but distinctive and quite unusual.
(2019) From the Chardonnay and Pinot stronghold of the Adelaide Hills, a Pinot Noir rosé that is crammed with sweet and summer berry aromas and flavours. Relatively deep in colour, touches of spices and watermelon sit atop crushed strawberry sundae - Eton mess in a glass. In the mouth the sweetness of the fruit is noticeable, perhaps a touch of residual sugar too, but there is a freshening blast of clean acidity and little herbaceous hint that adds to the crispness.