(2021) Marching to a different beat here, a wine made in stainless steel that sees no oak. Certified organic, plantings range from 1987 to early 1990s, on free-draining stony loam soils and black clay. Very vibrant purple in colour, the youth of this is obvious and it will need a little time: at the moment it is slightly closed and a touch reduced, but with coaxing some bold black fruit does come through. There's a chalkiness to this in the finish, the tannins dry and the acidity quite keen, but the fruit on the mid-palate is indeed pure, black and sweetly ripe. Maybe just a touch of noticeable alcohol heat in the finish. Note that price and stockist quoted are for a previous vintage at time of review.
(2021) A biodynamic certified wine from sandy loam soils, with limestone and clay. Average age of vines here is 30 years and the wine matured for 16 months in French oak barriques, 15% new. A very dark and deeply-coloured wine, it's another vinous expression, all liquorice twsited around black plum and blue/black berries. A little creamy oak supports. In the mouth this is a big wine. Powerfully structured with thick tannins and just enough plum-skin acidity, the density and polish of the dark fruit floods the palate. This is concentrated and certainly a bit of a blockbuster. No UK retail stockists listed at time of review.
(2021) From various soils including clay, sandy loam, red-brown earth and sand over limestone, part of the blend includes fruit from 100-year-old vines. The wine spent 17 months in French oak barrels, 35% new, of varying sizes. Vinous, dark, fragrant, with blackberry and plum, a suggestion of real ripeness and sweetness on the nose. Refined oak aromas. The palate has lovely weight and plushness of texture, but an elegant mix of sandy tannin and pert, juicy acidity slices through a more opulent mid-palate, giving this lovely overall appeal.
(2021) Made using organic practices, this comes from terra rossa soils (ferrous loam) over clay over limestone and spent 16 months in older French oak barriques. Deeper and more dense than the Hunter's, with more of a black fruit character. As well as that sweet and plush black fruit, some exotic spice. On the palate, a much more tannic wine, with raised acidity too to give structure and backbone to the quite meaty, thick dark fruit.
(2021) The vineyards here are 52 years old, planted on clay soils. The wine spends 14 months in large, 2,500-litre French oak casks. Vivid purple, but relatively transparent, there's real fragrance and lifted, floral aromas on this wine, all bright red fruits and violets, a touch of graphite and cedar in the background. In the mouth that elegant, rippling and creamy-fresh raspberry and cherry character is delightful, the fruit sweet, the tannins ripe and gentle and the acidity nicely balanced. My only criticism would be the oak feeling slightly prominent in the finish, but a charmer. No UK retail stockists listed at time of review.
(2021) A fabulous rendition of Sauvignon Blanc this, which went down a storm with tasters on my recent online tasting of New Zealand wines, becoming one of the highest scoring wines of any tasting I have presented. It marches to a distinctive beat, being certified organic, and fermented with wild yeast in French oak barrels. Made from a mix of Loire and Bordeaux Sauvignon clones, it bursts with southern hemisphere ripeness, notes of nectarine and juicy ogen melon, creamy almond supporting, and enough lime-like vivaciousness too. In the mouth the picture is similar: so juicy and sweet in terms of the fruit, but underpinned by that broader creaminess of texture and with dazzling acidity streaking through the finish. In many independent retailers as well as some Waitrose stores. Use the wine-searcher link to find other stockists and watch the video for more information and food-matching suggestions.
(2021) An arresting nose of pink grapefruit and burstingly-ripe nectarine on this Sauvignon Blanc (with some Riesling and Pinot Gris in the blend I believe) from Steve Smith's Pyramid Valley. There's a preserved lemon suggestion of firmness too, taut and bright. In the mouth so juicy: more nectarine, very ripe melon, just a hint of more exotic fruit and a fat orangey tang. Textured and creamy-rich on the mid-palate, the juicy freshness is maintained by the squeeze of grapefruit acidity and salinity in the finish. Imported into the UK by Louis Latour Agencies. Watch the video for more information and food-matching ideas.
(2021) Though weighing in with 14.5% alcohol, as always with Seven Springs' Syrah there is a European-style elegance here, with a lovely violet and old roses floral lift to the black fruit, touches of spice and cherry too. In the mouth the weight and density of the fruit and that alcohol becomes apparent - not overdone or obvious, but there's a certain sumptuous quality to this as well as firm, fine-grained tannins and pert acidity to balance.
(2021) This Pinot comes from the Awatere Valley, furthest south of Marlborough's wine regions, cool and influenced by the ocean more than the vineyards further north. That suits this delicate style of Pinot that for me is more on the rhubarb and beetroot, more vegetal spectrum which is an authentic expression of this variety. Very pale in colour, the fruit is of small red berries - cranberry and reducurrant - with a gentle influence of older oak barrels accentuating some spicy and vanilla components. Gentle tannins and good acidity. It's a wine in the distinctly cool-climate, red-fruited and savoury style. Watch the video for food-matching ideas and more information.
(2021) From a producer of Central Otago dedicated to Pinot Noir, this is rather beautiful: delicate in colour and fragrance, there's so much floral, raspberry and redcurrant elegance, a fine orange and bright, tart cherry skin tang of acidity shimmering on the palate against some subtle cream and exotic, smoky spice. Imported by Mentzendorff & Co., it's another refined and delightful Pinot from the schist soils of Akitu's higher altitude vineyards.