2001 wines at 20 years of age...

I'm always a bit worried as to what I'll get when I open a Grivot from this era, but this worked out well:

  • 2001 Domaine Jean Grivot Vosne-Romanée 1er Cru Les Beaux Monts - France, Burgundy, Côte de Nuits, Vosne-Romanée 1er Cru (28/03/2021)
    1/2, good cork (10% evenly soaked). Served at 14-15C.
    Pale/medium garnet core, wide pale garnet/mahogany rim. Nose is quite earthy and mineral, becoming richer as it warms slightly with some mushroom and a touch of liquorice. Medium bodied on the palate, soil, mineral, spice, with underlying dark fruit, quite rich, certainly mellow with soft tannins then nice vibrant acidity carrying a good length finish with liquorice notes. Excellent, drinking well, no particular hurry. (92 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
 
Opened a Ducru Beaucaillou 2001 on Saturday. Lovely wine, very composed, sweet and mature. It's extremely elegant but perhaps a bit under-powered by the standards of more recent vintages. Strikes me that it harks back to an era when Ducru made very classical Saint Julien whereas today (whilst I really admire the wines) it is more in the style of Pauillac Cabernet Sauvignon, if that makes sense.

I'm not cynical enough to say wannabe Latour but you know what I mean?

Anyway, the 2001 was not a showstopper. I didn't take a formal note but would probably rate it 90/100 which feels correct for the absolute quality but doesn't reflect the enjoyment of drinking a bottle.
 
A serendipitously superb bottle of Bouchard Nuits St Georges Les Cailles 2001 today, in a perfect place for pleasure but still quite purple and clearly with plenty left in the tank. It has the proper burgundy perfume, line, richness, enticing red fruit and great structural fortitude. I am often surprised by the excellence of the rather unsung Bouchard reds post 96, and I wish I had bought more.
 
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A serendipously superb bottle of Bouchard Nuits St Georges Les Cailles 2001 today, in a perfect place for pleasure but still quite purple and clearly with plenty left in the tank. It has the proper burgundy perfume, line, richness, enticing red fruit and great structural fortitude. I am often surprised by the excellence of the rather unsung Bouchard reds post 96, and I wish I had bought more.
After nearly 20 years of mediocrity quality rebounded after the change of ownership. The VC Ancienne Carnot ‘96 was a showstopping eye opener. For sentimental reasons, I pick up the cuvée whenever possible & occasionally other releases. The quality remains high, though I purchase Jadot more often, mainly due to it being easier to visit.
Negociant Burgundy merits attention.
 
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After nearly 20 years of mediocrity quality rebounded after the change of ownership. The VC Ancienne Carnot ‘96 was a showstopping eye opener. For sentimental reasons, I pick up the cuvée whenever possible & occasionally other releases. The quality remains high, though I purchase Jadot more often, mainly due to it being easier to visit.
Negociant Burgundy merits attention.
Ancienne Cuvée Carnot is not negociant Burgundy -- Bouchard P&F has owned the property since the 18th century. It may not be the best Caillerets but it is reliably good and attractive for the price (I have bought some vintages) and arguably is the best plot of Caillerets, which arguably is the greatest vineyard in Volnay.
 
Dominus 2001

This is 81% cab sav, 10% petit verdot, 5% merlot and 4% cab franc and 14% abv. This bottle had been vertical for a couple of weeks, was popped and poured and immediately sprang into life. Unlike the first growth Bordeaux from this vintage, that it is designed to emulate, it is fully open for business. Like it’s illustrious sibling, the 1991 Dominus, this was probably drinking well at ten years of age. It is bright, generous in every way and full-bodied, with no hidden nuances or dark secrets. Rich, ripe red and black fruits, with secondary flavours of herbs, tobacco and undergrowth. It has excellent balance, and enough acidity to keep rubber on’t’tarmac, and is not in anyway over-the-top like other Napa wines. Frighteningly easy to polish off in no time at all. It is Bordeaux-like and if I was served this blind I would have guessed Pichon Lalande from the 1980s, perhaps even the ‘82 or the ‘86, or a hypothetical blend of the two. While some of the CT notes predict this will go on for decades I don’t think it will improve with further cellaring. It really is a splendid wine at its apogee.

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Two whites also consumed last night.The Peter Jakob Kuhn was good but not exciting, and I much preferred the Lafouge.
 
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Lopez de Haro 2001 Classica Gran Reserva, recommended by a wizened guru from the Catalan hills, still feels quite young, plenty of the leathery stuff on the nose, a touch gritty, dark fruit with some spice, at £28 from TWS at 20 years old has to be seen as excellent VFM if not really a silky perfumed classic rioja.
 
Rioja Reserva Vina Tondonia Lopez de Heredia 2001 (half) - just not quite as good as my full bottle stocks. A bit more balsamic on the nose than I’d prefer, and somehow just a little less fragrant on the palate. The length is OK. I know that LdH bottle large barrel by large barrel so some variation is to be expected I suppose. Nevertheless, decent enough and ***.
 
After a decent half bottle of Billecart Salmon a really impressive bottle of Chateau Montrose 2001: opened early on, not decanted, poured a generous glass for my wife and me about 30 minutes before drinking, deep coloured, not really bright coloured, more brooding and not transparent, very enviting nose of red berries, cherry quite prominent, medium bodied, young, still on it‘s way to maturity but working really well with our lamb chops, green beans & gratin dauphinois. You need a semi mature wine for this dish imo and this Montrose worked perfectly. Not too young, not too old, not too oakey, not too fruity,low alcohol, only 12.5 % alcohol
Cheers
Rainer
 
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