A fault in the stars?

Opened a bottle of Minimalist Stars in the Dark 2020 yesterday. This was one of those wines that has been hyped and disappears quickly when released.
I thought I'd pop it a few hours in advance as some of the TNs suggested that it improved with air.
On immediate tasting, it seemed OK but a bit dumb (OK in that it wasn't corked or obviously bad).
Then later it tasted just a bit rubbish - confected oak and some bubblegum fruit-substitute.
I'm wondering if this was a bad bottle or just what it really does taste like. I'd be surprised, as many with fairly classical tastes have enthused about it.
So assuming the former, what kind of fault could that possibly be?
Luckily it's from TWS, so I'm sure they'll refund me with no quibble. Wondering about opening another one tonight for scientific purposes.


Edit to add: this wine massively improved overnight. See below.
 
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Opened a bottle of Minimalist Stars in the Dark 2020 yesterday. This was one of those wines that has been hyped and disappears quickly when released.
I thought I'd pop it a few hours in advance as some of the TNs suggested that it improved with air.
On immediate tasting, it seemed OK but a bit dumb (OK in that it wasn't corked or obviously bad).
Then later it tasted just a bit rubbish - confected oak and some bubblegum fruit-substitute.
I'm wondering if this was a bad bottle or just what it really does taste like. I'd be surprised, as many with fairly classical tastes have enthused about it.
So assuming the former, what kind of fault could that possibly be?
Luckily it's from TWS, so I'm sure they'll refund me with no quibble. Wondering about opening another one tonight for scientific purposes.
Interestingly Jancis recently described the 2021 as 'Wine-bar wine par excellence with a natural bent.'
 
So I thought I'd try some more from the bottle today to see if it's changed, and remarkably it has! It's now very much in Beaujolais territory, and quite a good one at that. Hopefully the improvement will continue in time for dinner. How strange.
I am now getting the sense of what HRH was on about - a freshness to it and "playful" fruit replacing the bubblegum.
 
Doesn't really sound like something I would want to drink so glad to have hesitated when the offers came out. That said, I am not hugely keen on Beaujolais (the heresy!).
 
It’s definitely light in style but I very much enjoyed the single bottle I’ve opened so far (with more stashed away). And I don’t really like Beaujolais either!

Here is Greg Sherwood’s review:

 
This wine is made with whole bunches so does have some semi-carbonic maceration like some cru Beaujolais. That process will create more confected fruit flavours so it’s part of the winemaking here
 
It has indeed moved on again, in a more classical Syrah direction. More serious but less fun. The oaky vanilla still stands out a bit, but there's no confection now. I think I liked it best about 24 hours after opening (i.e. this afternoon) and think I'll leave the remaining bottles for at least 5 years.
 
I am coming to the view that Syrah is almost like red Burgundy in how it ebbs and flows with time. And I suspect that while Keith might be pushing it a *bit* far - one can probably start to broach humbler SA Syrahs after half a decade, if you follow the 10 year rule you won't go wrong.
 
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