Aligoté

A big favourite for me, tho I'd contend it needs both old vines and old oak. Most of my favourite producers already mentioned here.

Dave- I have a sixer of Andrew and Emma's (which is properly wonderful), will bring you one next time we're together. They're also doing some of it with skin contact which I think has just been bottled.

A good article here from Alice F: http://www.alicefeiring.com/files/aligotés-return.pdf
 
A big favourite for me, tho I'd contend it needs both old vines and old oak. Most of my favourite producers already mentioned here.

Dave- I have a sixer of Andrew and Emma's (which is properly wonderful), will bring you one next time we're together. They're also doing some of it with skin contact which I think has just been bottled.

A good article here from Alice F: http://www.alicefeiring.com/files/aligotés-return.pdf
Thanks Oli. The skin contact sounds interesting. Bit of texture with the acidity sounds a way to go.
 
A big favourite for me, tho I'd contend it needs both old vines and old oak. Most of my favourite producers already mentioned here.

Dave- I have a sixer of Andrew and Emma's (which is properly wonderful), will bring you one next time we're together. They're also doing some of it with skin contact which I think has just been bottled.

A good article here from Alice F: http://www.alicefeiring.com/files/aligotés-return.pdf
I was a WoFW subbie back then (withdrew after 53) and I do vaguely recall that article. I will have to pull it down and read it again. Thanks.
 
Benoit Ente”s wines have nowhere near the class of Arnaud”s.

Very interesting that the latter acquired the parcel of Champ gain in Puligny . Yet to taste it but the price has already multiplied several times.....

Thread drift. I apologise. Just not an Aligoté fan I’m afraid.
 
Many producers I visit in Burgundy don't bother to show their Aligoté (as is the case in reds with Passetoutgrains and even sometimes with Bourgogne Pinot Noir).

More sepcifically, when visiting Chevillon in Nuits, I only occasionally see a white (usually already in bottle), and I've never seen the Bourgogne-Aligoté. But I came across a bottle of the 2015 in Kermit Lynch's store in Berkeley and it's really one of the best and most classic versions of the grape that I've experienced: stoniness playing against the fruit in a body that is medium-weight but light on the palate; good acidity but also some richness of texture.
 
Any thoughts on why that is the case Claude?
In addition to what Tom says above, it's possible that they feel that (1) there's already enough wine to taste, (2) the wine has been recently bottled and they don't want to open it, (3) the wine is intended mostly for consumption by the vigneron and friends or at least is not for the export market for the most part, (4) readers of specialized wine publications are interested only in "fine wine" (i.e., Pinot Noir and Chardonnay),* etc.

* I've been told by some vignerons that at least one of my colleagues (who is quite well-known) will not deign to taste anything but premier and grand cru, and I also know of individuals guided by importers who take the same position.
 
Last edited:
In addition to what Tom says above, it's possible that they feel that (1) there's already enough wine to taste, (2) the wine has been recently bottled and they don't want to open it, (3) the wine is intended mostly for consumption by the vigneron and friends or at least is not for the export market for the most part, (4) readers of specialized wine publications are interested only in "fine wine" (i.e., Pinot Noir and Chardonnay),* etc.

* I've been told by some vignerons that at least one of my colleagues (who is quite well-known) will not deign to taste anything but premier and grand cru, and I also know of individuals guided by importers who take the same position.
I like people like that. Let others pay a fortune for the top wines whilst we enjoy great wine for a bit less. Remember that Roulot Monthélie we drank a couple of years ago!
 
The Anne Boisson Aligote 2014 that I had during the week was stunning. Lovely mix of fresh zippy citrus with an underlying richness. Never had it before but was very impressed. Anyone else tried this?
 
In addition to what Tom says above, it's possible that they feel that (1) there's already enough wine to taste, (2) the wine has been recently bottled and they don't want to open it, (3) the wine is intended mostly for consumption by the vigneron and friends or at least is not for the export market for the most part, (4) readers of specialized wine publications are interested only in "fine wine" (i.e., Pinot Noir and Chardonnay),* etc.

* I've been told by some vignerons that at least one of my colleagues (who is quite well-known) will not deign to taste anything but premier and grand cru, and I also know of individuals guided by importers who take the same position.

During my days of tasting in Burgundy many producers were quite keen for us to taste their "lesser" wines, including Aligote, which we were only too happy to taste. The big problem apparently was, at the time anyway, it was impossible to sell.
 
During my days of tasting in Burgundy many producers were quite keen for us to taste their "lesser" wines, including Aligote, which we were only too happy to taste. The big problem apparently was, at the time anyway, it was impossible to sell.
In my experience, UK individual customers generally are more likely to take lesser wines and less fashionable vintages than are American individual customers.
 
Top