NWR Anyone buying a Tesla Model 3 (or any BEV) ?

So we got an ‘offer’ through.
Any thoughts on the value of this and if it affects residual value on sale?

Seems to me that it rather depends on the industry's ability to surmount the legal and regulatory obstacles that currently render "self-driving" software a fun but expensive toy (and thus it's cash that you won't recoup on resale). It'll happen, but how long will we have to wait? Of course as those barriers start to fall, the price that Elon charges for his software will rise. But I wouldn't spend the money yet.
 
Seems to me that it rather depends on the industry's ability to surmount the legal and regulatory obstacles that currently render "self-driving" software a fun but expensive toy (and thus it's cash that you won't recoup on resale). It'll happen, but how long will we have to wait? Of course as those barriers start to fall, the price that Elon charges for his software will rise. But I wouldn't spend the money yet.
I was really only considering the €3800 option.
 
I was really only considering the €3800 option.
on a test drive I loved the theatre of the summon function but the parking didn't seem worthwhile.. the autopilot on motorways was a hoot but requires nerves of steel as articulated lorries hurtle by! the need to put hands on wheel frequently tends to interrupt one's enjoyment of a good book:)
 
Your line "they'll be doing a lot of motorway journeys" means only the Tesla 3 for me. The Supercharger network is reliable and I have yet to have hsd to wait in 3+ years.

100% agree. Unless they plan to stay in London for a week after the drive from Bristol in order to recharge the car, the model 3 is the only practical option.
 
Complete waste of money, Russell!

I have those with EAP. Navigate on AutoPilot is useless in the EU, and Summon usually doesn't work. The time it would be useful is in multistorey carparks, and there's often no mobile signal there!
 
Your line "they'll be doing a lot of motorway journeys" means only the Tesla 3 for me. The Supercharger network is reliable and I have yet to have hsd to wait in 3+ years.
Actually no...
The motorway journeys are just between London and Bristol.
The alternatives have very decent range - enough to do the journey in one go without the need to charge. We're not talking a road trip to Rome or anything like that.
Also, the likes of Instavolt, Ionity and even good old Ecotricity are finally getting their act together and so ultrarapids will be viable in 2021, if not already.

They took an ID3 for a test drive yesterday, and felt that it wasn't as comfortable as they'd like. Polestar 2 is a Volvo, so great seats is a given. They'll be trying a 3 next week. The 3 (all Teslas, actually) are noisy at motorway speeds. ID3 is apparently the quietest, but I suspect Polestar won't be far behind. They're looking at the Tour edition of the ID3, so that might have improved seats. Sadly none available to look at yet.

It's the size that's the issue. Roger (my stepfather) really likes the Polestar, but my mum is very nervous about driving it. We'll have to get her to a test drive.

There are a lot of width restrictions in North London. The Golf is 1.79m wide, the 3 is 1.85, the Polestar 1.86 and the ID3 1.81
 
Just an update on this, they went for the Tesla 3LR in the end. Mostly because of looks (and a bit due to range). Tesla's valuation of their old Golf seemed very generous. Not sure how that will pan out. But on that subject...

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So happy. Woke up the other day to the sound of a drill outside. Turned out they installed a very unobtrusive ubitricity charging point right outside my house. No stupid monthly charge or need for a special charging lead costing £300. Just scan a qr code, input some basic details and off you go. £10 to charge the car from c. 90 miles to 270. Any charging issues I might have had now dealt with!
 
We average one charging point per street here and guess what, the bays are not restricted for EVs so there is almost always a non-electric vehicle parked in them. I will say that I plan 100% to buy a EV but I fear it will have to wait until we move to the country (hopefully 2022 or 2023 at very latest) and get off-road parking and our own charging point.

Some people nearby do run a cable from the house to the car across the pavement, using a rubber ramp for pedestrians, but I've been advised that this is illegal and would not buy a EV with the risk I could be told to stop. They do seem to turn a blind eye, but then there are also literally just a couple of people doing it right now. Imagine a cabler out of every letter box.

Don't think I'll buy a Tesla. Am happy with our Volvo XC and will likely stick with the brand.
 
There’s no restriction on who can park by this charger as long as they have a zone A Westminster permit. There’s several teslas around here so I suspect we’ll just swap numbers so we can call each other to swap parking spots when one of us needs to charge up.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Some people nearby do run a cable from the house to the car across the pavement, using a rubber ramp for pedestrians

Yes, a couple do that around us and it is indeed illegal to cross the footpath that way. We'd have to do that in Glasgow should we want to charge an electric car, and it was part of the reason (as well as parking getting worse) we were on the point of having a driveway installed in our garden before lockdown. That's been put on hold because of lockdown, and although we'd gone for an electric gate which bumped up the cost considerably, between footway lowering, a tree surgeon's report, planning permission, the driveway installer and gate installer, we are in for £12k+ if we go ahead - before any charging point is installed. If it was just to be able to charge, it would be silly to spend that sort of money, so if we decide we don't need the parking once we're back in the new normal, we will have to wait for the charging infrastructure to improve to go electric.
 
I saw an interesting statistic this morning - Tesla's investment in BTC has the carbon footprint of 1,800,000 combustion engine cars. Not a great case of joined up thinking. I don't think that Tesla has even sold that many electric cars.
 
I think some of the Tesla Fanbois (and gals) have come up with some mitigating arguments, even a convoluted logic that BTC can be seen as a "battery", but it's not a good look.

Meanwhile, the government EV car grant is no longer going to be applicable to cars over £35k (which includes all the Tesla models).
 
Yes Richard , in my opinion the carbon footprint of each car produced including combustion vehicles should be as obvious as the sale price. There for a more informed decision
 
How does one calculate the carbon footprint of owning Bitcoin, if it gets traded via 10 people do they all take the full hit?

Anyway. We got 14 days free autopilot, summon etc, will go check it out when I can.
 
How does one calculate the carbon footprint of owning Bitcoin, if it gets traded via 10 people do they all take the full hit?
I don't know, but there's plenty of irresponsibility to share around. From the FT: 'Each bitcoin transaction uses the same amount of power as 436,000 through the Visa payment system.' BTC is bad enough, but it really riles me when so-called green companies like Tesla turn out to be exactly the opposite. If Tesla can't be bothered to be properly green, why should consumers? It sets an extremely poor example and gives fuel (no pun intended) to those who are sceptical about green initiatives.
 
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