Barolo producers who don't use oak?

Does anyone know of a Barolo producer who uses no oak, at least for their non-DOCG wines (as the DOCG dictates that there must be a minimum of 18 months of barrel ageing)?

I know there are the traditionalists like Conterno who just use botti, but I wondered if there is anyone who is only using cement, or concrete (or terracotta) - or chestnut barrels instead of oak perhaps?

It did also occur to me that botti were often made from chestnut in the past, as it was cheaper and more plentiful locally - so maybe some producers who have old botti are indeed not using oak?
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Simon, I'm not sure of the question: when you say "at least for their non-DOCG wines," then these wouldn't be Barolo, so are you looking for examples of a producer of Barolo who also makes IGT or even Barbera or Docetto wines - that never see oak? I think there are quite a lot of those aren't there?
 
Ideally, a producer making some declassified Nebbiolo (so in the Barolo but they declassify to Langhe DOC or even IGT).

The reason being I'm writing about the move away from barriques (and even from oak in general) across Italy. And in many ways this trend has been most extreme in Barolo, what with the Barolo boys in the late 1980s etc. But I realised just now as I was looking down my long list of producers who don't use any oak, I had no-one actually in the Barolo region (but yes plenty in Piedmont, and lots of great Barbera and Dolcetto matured in cement or even just in steel).
 
Vajra's Langhe Nebbiolo is made from young wines in their Barolo vineyards and spends time only in stainless steel tanks and bottle. However there is also some Nebbiolo from Sinio in the blend....
 
Hello, it's been a while since I have posted on here.

Giacomo Brezza, or Enzo Brezza if you like, makes a Langhe Nebbiolo aged just in steel. Vineyards in the commune of Barolo.

I am sure there are others aside from those already mentioned. I'll have a wee think.
 
Got another one ... Tenuta Cucco. Very smart winery in Serralunga with new owners. Their Langhe Nebbiolo is all from Serralunga, quite possibly from the Cerrati Cru, but they also also a small part of Bricco Voghera, or Vughera as they call it. Anyhow, both are very smart 'menzioni'.
 
Hello, it's been a while since I have posted on here.

Giacomo Brezza, or Enzo Brezza if you like, makes a Langhe Nebbiolo aged just in steel. Vineyards in the commune of Barolo.

I am sure there are others aside from those already mentioned. I'll have a wee think.

Good spot Richard, though I'd add that in my experience Brezza are making their Langhe Nebbiolo in the fresh & breezy young-drinking style, rather than as declassified Barolo. It's nothing like their senior wines.

To my mind a more ageworthy Nebbiolo is Brovia's Nebbiolo d'Alba Valmaggione, which also sees no oak. I keep a few bottles for 10-15 years cellar time.

I'll give another answer which doesn't address Simon's question(!) - in Veneto Bertani are experimenting with ageing some of their Valpol in cherry & chestnut. Their "Bertani Secco" red is one such.
 
Too easy Filippo; Fabio Alessandria uses whole bunch fermentation for the Monvigliero at Burlotto. There is a nice video of the two vats bubbling away on TWS website under "Travels in Wine".
 
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Paolo Scavino makes two Barbera, one in stainless steel and one in oak. Whether the stainless steel one is both fermented and stored in steel, I'm not sure.
 
I'll give another answer which doesn't address Simon's question(!) - in Veneto Bertani are experimenting with ageing some of their Valpol in cherry & chestnut. Their "Bertani Secco" red is one such.
I really do like the Bertani Secco and have even cellared a few to see what develops - though I cannot recall the vintage.
 
Thanks Mahmoud, useful to know - I haven't tried it yet, but it's part of a tasting I'm putting on the local group next month, hence doing the background reading on winemaking, elevage, etc.
 
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