NWR Climate change

In case this is the right place to follow up my minor beef with Ed stimulated by the serving of it at Piemonte Wimps:

'The agriculture sector consists of emissions from livestock, agricultural soils, stationary
combustion sources and off-road machinery. It is estimated to have been responsible for 11% of greenhouse gas emissions in the UK in 2020. Emissions of methane (55%) and nitrous oxide (32%) dominate this sector. The most significant sources here are emissions of methane due to enteric fermentation (digestion processes) from livestock, particularly cattle; and nitrous oxide emissions related to the use of fertilisers on agricultural soils.'

https://assets.publishing.service.g...enhouse-gas-emissions-statistical-release.pdf

Grass fed cows still burp methane. If at some future time they were farmed regeneratively and sustainably the tiny resulting quantity and high cost would effectively rule out serving it in restaurants.
 
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Farming has played its part in climate change, but also can help with solutions. The potential for carbon sequestration in our soils is really quite enormous.

Regarding Jeremy’s views on beef it’s fair to say that we might not agree. But large herbivores have been around for a long time, it’s not their existence that has contributed to global warming but rather the way in which they have been exploited by mankind. Cattle can be raised in a manner which isn’t detrimental to our planet and needn’t be exorbitantly expensive, just perhaps not as ridiculously cheap as it is now.
 
Farming has played its part in climate change, but also can help with solutions. The potential for carbon sequestration in our soils is really quite enormous.

Regarding Jeremy’s views on beef it’s fair to say that we might not agree. But large herbivores have been around for a long time, it’s not their existence that has contributed to global warming but rather the way in which they have been exploited by mankind. Cattle can be raised in a manner which isn’t detrimental to our planet and needn’t be exorbitantly expensive, just perhaps not as ridiculously cheap as it is now.
I think I agree with everything you said there Ed, except the conclusion. If we weren't already nudging 1.5C above pre-industrial temperatures, raising cattle wouldn't be a climate issue. Unfortunately we are. I'd like this not to be the case as I am particularly fond of cheese, and goats don't seem to be able to make really first class hard cheeses.
 
I think I agree with everything you said there Ed, except the conclusion. If we weren't already nudging 1.5C above pre-industrial temperatures, raising cattle wouldn't be a climate issue. Unfortunately we are. I'd like this not to be the case as I am particularly fond of cheese, and goats don't seem to be able to make really first class hard cheeses.
What's the proportion of contribution to CO2 of dairy vs meat farming of cattle?
 
More than half the rain forest was felled to grow Soya, high in profits due to low cost maintenance and disease free.Grown entirely for farm beast/feed. Biggest export china.
 
People keep asking me about the effect of climate change and assume that our yields are smaller and our alcohol levels higher.
It's not as simple as that. Drought is a serious concern here in Roussillon and the local syndicates are pushing for AOP vineyards to be allowed to install irrigation, not just to counter drought but to increase yield to compensate for the low price of the existing wine on the bulk market. Drought also doesn't have those effects. The main thing it does is retard ripening, especially the fall in acidity. Our two driest years have resulted in wines with higher acidity and more tannin. Perhaps the opposite of what consumers imagine. But I could have delayed harvesting by a month, waiting for october rains, and made different wines, as some of my neighbours did.

My experience this year is that the record summer heat-wave shortened both the ripening period and the harvest period. Two of my vineyards suffered from low yields but one was from poor fruit-set and the other perhaps because I picked it too soon. The rest were in line or better than average.
The condition of the fruit was fantastic. Almost no losses due to fungal diseases or insect damage. Contrary to the layman's view, the wines have lower alcohol levels and well-balanced acidity. We will see if they make equally complex wines as "normal" years but I think they will. The only downside for me so far was having to hand-pick in hotter temperatures.
 
People keep asking me about the effect of climate change and assume that our yields are smaller and our alcohol levels higher.
It's not as simple as that. Drought is a serious concern here in Roussillon and the local syndicates are pushing for AOP vineyards to be allowed to install irrigation, not just to counter drought but to increase yield to compensate for the low price of the existing wine on the bulk market. Drought also doesn't have those effects. The main thing it does is retard ripening, especially the fall in acidity. Our two driest years have resulted in wines with higher acidity and more tannin. Perhaps the opposite of what consumers imagine. But I could have delayed harvesting by a month, waiting for october rains, and made different wines, as some of my neighbours did.

My experience this year is that the record summer heat-wave shortened both the ripening period and the harvest period. Two of my vineyards suffered from low yields but one was from poor fruit-set and the other perhaps because I picked it too soon. The rest were in line or better than average.
The condition of the fruit was fantastic. Almost no losses due to fungal diseases or insect damage. Contrary to the layman's view, the wines have lower alcohol levels and well-balanced acidity. We will see if they make equally complex wines as "normal" years but I think they will. The only downside for me so far was having to hand-pick in hotter temperatures.
V interesting, Jonathan. Maybe Future World won't be doomed to clunky wine after all, just new techniques.
 
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