NWR Cricket

I'm thinking more that the internationally the game has moved more towards the one day format which has led to the demise of the test game. Therefore I don't think you can lay the blame for the test team struggling at the door of the ECB. After all England are the current 1 day world Cup champions.

As I've said earlier, the pressure on the county game due to the 1 day format has led to the amount of 3 day cricket being reduced and also being played at the most rain affected time of the year.
 
Demise meaning what? Lack of spectators? Lack of being taken seriously?
Clearly not the former... Seems like we've been talking about the death of Test cricket since at least the 1980s. Ain't happened yet.

Is the Test team really struggling? We lost heavily to India in India, but that's hardly unusual. I think I'm right in saying that prior to this summer, losing to an extremely strong New Zealand team, the last home Test series we lost was a very tight two-gamer against Sri Lanka in 2014. That's pretty remarkable.

Looking at the team it feels like we've got a really solid seam bowling unit - even with all of Archer, Broad, Wood and Woakes injured, and Stokes missing - how would the Aussies get on if Starc, Cummins and Hazlewood were out? It's easy to make arguments about who should be picked at wicket keeper but while I guess most of us here would prefer to see a genuine specialist like Foakes, it wouldn't be an unarguably idiotic decision to play Buttler there if he was in some kind of batting form.

Batting is definitely a bit frail at the moment but if Hameed can cement the opening position, Stokes returns, and Pope recovers from injury and starts to fulfil his undoubted promise then all of a sudden that could start looking a bit rosier.

All in all yeah, we're certainly not world-beaters right now but no team should ever be the unchallenged best. Words like "demise" I just don't understand at all.
 
Clearly not the former... Seems like we've been talking about the death of Test cricket since at least the 1980s. Ain't happened yet.

Is the Test team really struggling? We lost heavily to India in India, but that's hardly unusual. I think I'm right in saying that prior to this summer, losing to an extremely strong New Zealand team, the last home Test series we lost was a very tight two-gamer against Sri Lanka in 2014. That's pretty remarkable.

Looking at the team it feels like we've got a really solid seam bowling unit - even with all of Archer, Broad, Wood and Woakes injured, and Stokes missing - how would the Aussies get on if Starc, Cummins and Hazlewood were out? It's easy to make arguments about who should be picked at wicket keeper but while I guess most of us here would prefer to see a genuine specialist like Foakes, it wouldn't be an unarguably idiotic decision to play Buttler there if he was in some kind of batting form.

Batting is definitely a bit frail at the moment but if Hameed can cement the opening position, Stokes returns, and Pope recovers from injury and starts to fulfil his undoubted promise then all of a sudden that could start looking a bit rosier.

All in all yeah, we're certainly not world-beaters right now but no team should ever be the unchallenged best. Words like "demise" I just don't understand at all.
1630232122376.png

I was surprised to see this but facts are facts! Not just a great test batsman but also a pretty fair captain!
 
I guess the existential argument is that the structure of the game below the test level are all teaching people to play short form cricket (although I'd blame the BCCI and TV companies more than the ECB), which is possibly reflected in the somewhat perilous batting.

But as someone who grew up watching the England team between 1988 through the 90s funeral rites do seem an over-reaction... Amazing how recent those very winning (in % terms not just raw numbers, too) captains all are - surely a lot of that is down to central contracts and the professionalism that came out of that.
 
I guess the existential argument is that the structure of the game below the test level are all teaching people to play short form cricket (although I'd blame the BCCI and TV companies more than the ECB), which is possibly reflected in the somewhat perilous batting.

But as someone who grew up watching the England team between 1988 through the 90s funeral rites do seem an over-reaction... Amazing how recent those very winning (in % terms not just raw numbers, too) captains all are - surely a lot of that is down to central contracts and the professionalism that came out of that.
My hunch is that the high win percentages of the modern captains may also be a function of the decline in the percentage of drawn games. It would be interesting to see the table configured for the percentage of matches not lost.
 
For cricket to prosper there will need to be some kind of entente cordiale between the test game and the (very) short forms. Test cricket and the short forms appeal to different groups of people. There's also no doubt that T20 and the 100 series have high appeal. It may remain messy for a while, but an effective compromise is in everyone's interest in the long term. It's also not impossible that a few white ball cricketers could cross over to test cricket. Dawid Malan is the current example.
 
Malan is an interesting one isn’t he? Number one rated T20 batsman in the world but by no means a certainty in the England T20 side for the long term. Possibly always has been suited more to the longer forms but has found a way to make it work in T20.
 
My hunch is that the high win percentages of the modern captains may also be a function of the decline in the percentage of drawn games. It would be interesting to see the table configured for the percentage of matches not lost.
1630508617726.png

Games that have a result increased from a half to three quarters. This is OK by me. This graph is all test match nations, not just England.
 
It's painful watching England this afternoon. The bowling is tame and the fielding is poor. The pitch is offering the seam bowlers nothing, so why persist with them? Now we have to score 367 in the fourth innings.
 
Why wouldn't The Poms take a winning point of view and have a go. Historically speaking they will lose by a margin. Adopt the 50 over mentality and entertain the crowd
 
I think the collapse is down to excellent bowling by India more than anything else.
Indeed, the first hour after lunch with Jadeja and Bumrah was match winning. The fact that the wickets were also shared between the bowlers was testament to Kohli's bowling changes. Overall an inspirational performance by the Indians. Which will be no doubt taken to Old Trafford, where presently the weather will have little effect. So an outcome is on the cards.
 
Top