NWR ebike advice

No further forward in making a decision, but if going folding electric, this looks quite appealing - Pedibal Navigata CitE Instant Throttle Folding Electric Bike

It's important to choose between a motor that responds to the torque you apply to the pedals or one which is a bit like a moped. This one sounds like a moped. Almost all cyclists will sat the torque style is best because a) it feels more like riding a bike with a tail wind and b) it is safer and will help you get fit.

I've seen irresponsible people with throttle e-bikes piling along busy shared cycle paths at speeds they couldn't achieve with their legs.
 
Jonathan’s advice is excellent, particularly the bit about ignoring those who say you shouldn’t get an ebike. I’ve been a cyclist for approaching 60 years and haven’t yet succumbed to an ebike myself but I encouraged Mrs B to get one. She actually did a meaningful trial run when we went on a cycling holiday down the Mosel from Trier to Coblenz and the bike she hired was an electric one. She’d always enjoyed riding the conventional bike she had at home but, for exactly the reasons given by Jon, she wanted to try an ebike. The Mosel trip converted her and we therefore got her one later that year. Since then she’s ridden much more than she used to do, and more ambitious trips too.

I’d have thought that a straight handle-barred hybrid type would probably be best for your circumstances. I’d only consider drop bars if you’re used to riding that style of bike. Mrs B likes the (front only) suspension on her bike. Disk brakes are a must, given the weight of the bike.
 

My friend has that folding e-bike and he has been very satisfied with it for two years now. He is light and it is used mainly for city commute and occasionally he takes it with him for his summer cottage to ride there. So not very challenging use for the bike. I'm 6'4" and 120kg and I have tried it once and it didn't feel brittle nor too small for me. Actually I quite enjoyed my test drive with it and have beed considering buying an e-bike ever since.

My neighbor and good friend invested in Tern electric bike which is kind of a cargo bike. It doesn't fold but doesn't take more space than normal bike either. She absolutely loves it and uses it instead of the car. She packs her quite decent sized dog and her 10 years old child to it with all their gear and go for longer trips with it. It handles up to 200kg load and still has almost 200km range!
I have tried it as well and it's really great to drive and don't feel small.
But the cost is over 5000€ before you start to add the extras. (which are big part of the attraction)

I know that is not what you are after Tom but thought to share it anyway in case someone else is considering buying a cargo e-bike.

 
I took up cycling during the lockdown last May, and have gone from 0km to over 6000km in the last 12 months, most of which is on the flat along the Danube. Now I venture into the hills, but this is hard work, not a leisurely cruise. So whilst a carbon racer may be great for me, I would be careful of taking a lightweight trekking bike unless you are committed to the hard work. Would it be possible, at reasonable cost, to rent each of the 3 types of bike for a whole day, or even a full weekend, not just a 1 hour test ride around the car park?
That way, you can have a better idea of what is right for you. Maybe shorter but harder rides on a real bike you find are great for working up an appetite, or that you want to see more, so a traditional frame e-bike may be more for your needs, or, even a folding e-bike as you just want the convenience to throw it in the car and go somewhere, and will use it far more, but probably not too far off the beaten track
Once you can narrow this down, then go to your LBS and see if they have time for you.
 
The other thing to consider is our winters - will you really be out and about on a bike (electric or self-powered) over the winter months? Squash was my winter sport and cycling was my summer sport so it didn't really matter too much and I stopped commuting by bike from Sept to March/April as it was too dangerous cycling in the dark and icy weather. It may sound like a nice thing to do when the sun is shining and there's not a lot of wind but in reality these days are here for a short time. We encountered many a spring training run when it was bitterly cold and, to be honest, it wasn't much fun even at a relatively young age of 30-35. At 60 it would be horrendous. But, as I said I had squash (very competitive at regional level) to keep me fit over the autumn/winter/spring.
 
Everything everyone says is true...however this is the worst time in history to buy a bicycle - supplies are so constrained that you may find yourself limited to what is available to actually buy. It’s a bit like deciding which burgundy you’d like to buy EP…

My anecdata suggest that things aren’t quite as bad as they were earlier in the year, but it’s still worse than any time I remember Pre pandemic, and bike shops and manufacturers seem to be looking at 6-12 month lead times for bikes and parts…
 
Don’t think so Alex - would of course have an impact on ebikes and things like power meters and electric groupsets…but even old school normie bikes are in short supply. I suspect that running a bike company today is a bit like being a factory manager in the old eastern block - the problem isn’t selling your stock, it’s buying enough components to make it.
 
Everything everyone says is true...however this is the worst time in history to buy a bicycle - supplies are so constrained that you may find yourself limited to what is available to actually buy. It’s a bit like deciding which burgundy you’d like to buy EP…

My anecdata suggest that things aren’t quite as bad as they were earlier in the year, but it’s still worse than any time I remember Pre pandemic, and bike shops and manufacturers seem to be looking at 6-12 month lead times for bikes and parts…
This is definitely true. There's a shortage of everything from batteries to chainsets to frame components. Everyone and his dog has taken up cycling and the factories are all in countries with the most severe worker shortages due to covid. I was due to get my bike in April. It was delayed for 2 months and then the frame painter decided to ignore my colour choices and do his own thing, which ended up looking like something from Toytown. I said I'd rather wait for a new frame to be painted but there are no seat-stays available so it looks like October before I'll get the bike. I'm being patient but I can see the temptation to buy something that is available now rather than the bike you really want.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Yes, quite a few bikes I've looked at are out of stock. Re the Navigata, I was homing in on it but noted black was out of stock so dropped them a line asking if/when it would be available and they said October, but at £1119 rather than £999.
 
During the lockdowns last year thousands of people bought bikes and available stocks were cleared out. That left a massive backlog of production to make up, even without subsequent component shortages.
 
Yes, quite a few bikes I've looked at are out of stock. Re the Navigata, I was homing in on it but noted black was out of stock so dropped them a line asking if/when it would be available and they said October, but at £1119 rather than £999.
If you are currently bikeless, I would strongly recommend just buying something that's in stock. Unlike EP burgundy, the sooner you own a bicycle the better. The more you ride it, the more awesome you become. There's really no downside.

To your specific point @Tom Cannavan - I wouldn't even dream of having a colour preference right now...I was able to get a hens teeth six speed Brompton in under 2 months just by telling a bike shop that I would give them a deposit for the next bike that came in regardless of colour...
 
this is the worst time in history to buy a bicycle
Probably about as bad as in the 90s when cycling, especially mountain biking, became the latest fad of the 'yuppy' (remember them?). As a result prices for everything cycling related went through the roof, much to the dismay of us hardened disciples. However, it was soon followed by a glut of mint condition second-hand bikes, when they realised it wasn't as easy as it looked.
It’s a bit like deciding which burgundy you’d like to buy EP…
:) At least you're not forced into buying a kid's tricycle to get the top of the range road racer that you desire.
During the lockdowns last year thousands of people bought bikes and available stocks were cleared out.
I can see a repeat of the 90's when the new enthusiasts realise that that 'real' cycling can be hard work and the British weather is not constantly conducive to the image of continental cycling.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
So look out for the glut of 'one careful owner' second-hand bikes appearing over the winter? :)

Apropos of that and the world chip shortage, passed a large Volvo dealer in Inverness last week while on holiday and noticed several nearly new cars in the forecourt - pre-registers or demonstrators - which is exactly what I am thinking of buying next. We pulled in for a nose around and were nabbed by a salesman who told us that because of stock shortage caused by the chip situation he'd never seen trade in values like current ones in his life. He valued my current car at fully £5,000 more to trade-in than a Glasgow dealership did 6 weeks ago, against a very, very similar pre-registered model at much the same price.
 
So look out for the glut of 'one careful owner' second-hand bikes appearing over the winter? :)

Apropos of that and the world chip shortage, passed a large Volvo dealer in Inverness last week while on holiday and noticed several nearly new cars in the forecourt - pre-registers or demonstrators - which is exactly what I am thinking of buying next. We pulled in for a nose around and were nabbed by a salesman who told us that because of stock shortage caused by the chip situation he'd never seen trade in values like current ones in his life. He valued my current car at fully £5,000 more to trade-in than a Glasgow dealership did 6 weeks ago, against a very, very similar pre-registered model at much the same price.
Indeed - WeBuyAnyCar valuations for Teslas have been rising in recent months.
 
Even the second hand market is ridiculously priced at the moment. People are taking advantage of the demand at the moment and not dropping the original price much. A recent advert had me rolling in the aisles when he claimed the bike had been bought of £2500 and a £750 set of wheels put on it. I priced the wheels at £400 and someone else posted the bike was currently on sale in Decathlon for £1500. He was asking £1600.

It unfortunately will be a year or 2 before we get back to sensible pricing and manufacturers being able to supply parts for current demand. It doesn't help that one big parts and wheels manufacturer in Japan prior to lock down had a massive fire.

Jonathan, there's a difference between rolling terrain and hills. A few runs upto Thuir, over to Fourques then back to Trouillas and you'll think of it as it should be, a flat run! You'll be ready for a wee jolly upto Camelas or over to Estagel for a beer, then you'll be doing hills.

On a more serious note, people tend to avoid hills. But you should be doing them to build up strength and stamina. Personally speaking I prefer going up them to coming down them.
 
Its 6 and 2 3's isn't it? Autumn is almost upon us, so buy now and apart from a few runs the bike will probably be idle over the winter months. Wait until the new year and you may find pristine second-hand bikes for sale and new bikes may become more readily available as they sort out the parts supply problems.
I never cycled over the winter and played squash instead, mainly because I was at work during the hours of daylight, live outside Edinburgh where roads weren't terribly well lit back then so found it too dangerous. I'd be even less inclined now as the roads are so much busier (and few drivers make allowances for cyclists, especially when they are in control of a large vehicle) and their conditions are pretty atrocious for the cyclist with loads of potholes (often full of rainwater in the winter). Then you'd have wet leaves, and black ice to add to the excitement. I always waited until the clocks changed in spring before getting back on the road.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
If you get on your existing bike regular enough in the mean time, you might end up thinking why do I need an E bike. ;)

Sean, I'm bikeless at the moment and have been for about 40 years! Bike used to be a racer with dropped handlebars, but that was then and this is now - the new normal! :)
 
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