European Travel and Holidays 2021/22

As far as going to France at Xmas is concerned, I would hope by then that our wonderfully intelligent British civil servants will recognise the Indian Ocean and Caribbean Sea next time they do a "deep dive" into French statistics, and know the difference between "l'Hexagone"; La France Metropole"; and "La France". The last of these incudes the Departments of Guadeloupe; Martinique; French Guiana; Mayotte; and La Réunion.

I know the French can be pretty bad at knowing the difference between England: Great Britain; and the United Kingdom but our leaders and their advisors are supposed to be pretty bright, not thick as pig-s***, which is implied by this recent decision.
 
Good news is places are bookable in the UK for October half term, at least outside the most popular national parks.

But the question we face is whether to book, or hope a trip to France in October may be possible without 10 day quarantine on return (that wouldn't work for my wife's work). Hmmm.
 
Good news is places are bookable in the UK for October half term, at least outside the most popular national parks.

But the question we face is whether to book, or hope a trip to France in October may be possible without 10 day quarantine on return (that wouldn't work for my wife's work). Hmmm.
It’s just unknowable Guy! Even if one knew the statistics for each of France and U.K. in advance who knows what measures the U.K. might have in place then!!
 
An Italian colleague rented a camper van and took his wife and teenage sons around the Cotswolds for a long weekend a few weeks back. They all seemed to enjoy it and he said it wasn’t very pricy.
 
So the France situation potentially is more ridiculous than imagined. Looking at the French cases there has been a rise in pure Beta numbers but from what I can see these are mostly from La Reunion, where the beta strain is 100% dominant and numbers rising. These figures are included in France’s overall numbers along with Mayotte . (This has also been suggested in a couple or articles)
Delta is now over 70% in France, so overtaking rapidly. You would normally say that surely these numbers were not misinterpreted and the French African island numbers counted, but I’m not confident of much these days in such matters.
 
has anybody managed to find actual statistics on the variants and where they are prevalent in France (all parts)? I havent from french government covid site, nor from the Observer article
I saw one stat saying there were 88 cases of beta in France over the last 4 weeks (Connexion and other outlets). La Reunion cases are 1400 and rising per day. (I don’t have daily numbers for Mayotte) La reunion is beta variant only.

One snippet on sampling gave further strength.
“France is also screening tests to detect the Beta variant. Between July 6 and 12, 18,777 random positive PCR tests were screened.

The mutation that causes the Beta variant was found in 1,787 samples, equal to 10.7% of all tests that were screened. “
 
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Hmmmh 1787/18777 is not 10.7%... Just being pedantic... Reunion and Mayotte closer to South Africa than to Metropolitan France.
No that was the percentage based on positives from the samples I believe.
They have a breakdown map per region but doesn’t quite add up. Mayotte and Reunion over 900 each so the bulk of numbers are coming from there which is my whole point.
 
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Good news is places are bookable in the UK for October half term, at least outside the most popular national parks.

But the question we face is whether to book, or hope a trip to France in October may be possible without 10 day quarantine on return (that wouldn't work for my wife's work). Hmmm.
I guess you could shorten the holiday a bit and pay the £50 for a day 5 release test?
But one can be fairly sure that the rules won't be the same then. Probably France won't let anyone in from the UK at all!
 
Good news is places are bookable in the UK for October half term, at least outside the most popular national parks.

But the question we face is whether to book, or hope a trip to France in October may be possible without 10 day quarantine on return (that wouldn't work for my wife's work). Hmmm.
Guy - I would play safe and go for the UK. Everything is so fluid around international travel that it is inviting disappointment and/or a lot of hassle. I'm certainly waiting until travel is likely to be a bit more fun that it is right now before planning anything. Having been in full lockdown in Italy and France for nearly two months last year, it was a pretty average experience at best, and frankly a wild waste of money.
 
Hi,
The NHS says not to have another COVID test for 90 days after testing positive, I assume as there is a risk of a false positive? Anyone know what the chances of this are? I tested positive for COVID-19 on 18/6 and I'd like to go and visit the family in the US, preferably in August. Surprising, the US is being quite reasonable in that: "All airline passengers to the United States ages two years and older must provide a negative COVID-19 viral test taken within three calendar days of travel regardless of where they are traveling from. Alternatively, travelers to the United States may provide documentation from a licensed health care provider of having recovered from COVID-19 in the 90 days preceding travel."
However, from what I can determine the only way to return to the UK is to provide a negative COVID-19 test, within 3 days of travel, and I'm afraid that once I'm out there I could end up standed until I eventually test negative!! Any thoughts on the actual chances of this?
cheers
steve
 
Get yourself tested, Steve. 'False positive' can either mean a false reading when there's no infection or, as I think you mean, a genuinely positive reading but one which has persisted after a person has ceased to be infectious. The former are unavoidable just because tests are never perfect. But if you test negative now, your chance of a fresh false positive should in future be the same as anyone else's, and not raised by the fact you've had a recent infection.
 
Hi,
The NHS says not to have another COVID test for 90 days after testing positive, I assume as there is a risk of a false positive? Anyone know what the chances of this are? I tested positive for COVID-19 on 18/6 and I'd like to go and visit the family in the US, preferably in August. Surprising, the US is being quite reasonable in that: "All airline passengers to the United States ages two years and older must provide a negative COVID-19 viral test taken within three calendar days of travel regardless of where they are traveling from. Alternatively, travelers to the United States may provide documentation from a licensed health care provider of having recovered from COVID-19 in the 90 days preceding travel."
However, from what I can determine the only way to return to the UK is to provide a negative COVID-19 test, within 3 days of travel, and I'm afraid that once I'm out there I could end up standed until I eventually test negative!! Any thoughts on the actual chances of this?
cheers
steve
Steve,

We’re in the same boat with a daughter who recovered from covid just before we left for the US. My understanding was she could return to the UK based on the covid recovery certificate provided by her GP. I’ll certainly double check though!

Dan
 
I had a positive test at the end of December and have had 15 or so tests since, all negative. Of all the people I caught it with (18 of us tested positive on an oil rig) no-one has had a positive test since so I think the chance of a past infection causing a positive result must be fairly small.

I do still get nervous every time I take a test before boarding a flight home though. A positive test leading to isolation quarantine (again) in another country when you're within touching distance of getting home is pretty depressing!
 
Yes the beta variant is prevalent in French territories, not on the French mainland - even though Astra is not particularly efficacious against beta the reason why the Johnson government decided to change the guidance re France was to deflect attention from the exponential rise in cases here, and to give succour to the fiction that things are even worse overseas. This from a reliable source close to the government.
 
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