Good Films About Wine

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NY
I recently watched a good film about wine called “Bottle Shock” (2008). Can you advice some other good movies about wine?
 

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Sour Grapes about Rudi K is very good, and I enjoyed both Somm movies.

Sideways of course, though whether it's actually about wine, is up for discussion.
 
Alan Rickman’s “Bottle Shock”, which is loosely based on ‘The Judgement of Paris’. There are some very funny moments, a light-hearted and entertaining film.
 
Falling Leaves is a Georgian film, shown in Cannes in 1968, and is now available on YouTube:
Story is about a young employee at a Soviet wine factory in Georgia who was told to bottle a cask immediately, when it needed fining and more time. Broader themes include integrity and the Soviet disregard for Georgian traditional winemaking.

I could also list a handful of less well-known, and difficult to get, wine documentaries if anyone is interested. Not sure how good you might think they are, but they were all of interest to me and some IMO are very good artistically.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
It's funny but reading through this I realise I've seen most of them (including catching up with Sour Grapes on Netflix last week), and really don't rate any of them very highly. Sideways I guess is the 'best' in terms of entertainment, but the rest that I've seen seemed to me to be trite, weak, flawed, or all three. Maybe the forum should start crowd-funding the first truly great wine-related movie...
 
It's funny but reading through this I realise I've seen most of them (including catching up with Sour Grapes on Netflix last week), and really don't rate any of them very highly. Sideways I guess is the 'best' in terms of entertainment, but the rest that I've seen seemed to me to be trite, weak, flawed, or all three. Maybe the forum should start crowd-funding the first truly great wine-related movie...

"One man. An outsider in the insider’s world of Burgundy. A man who took on the system; who fought injustices and who battled against his own demons. Could the collective forces of a thousand years; racism; the INAO, French tax authorities, US shipping companies, the buying public and thousands more combine to suppress the irrepressible spirit of that man who was armed only with some promises and a barrel of Chambertin?

At cinemas near you from….well, who knows?"

Anyone fancy crowdfunding that one? :)
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
"One man. An outsider in the insider’s world of Burgundy. A man who took on the system; who fought injustices and who battled against his own demons. Could the collective forces of a thousand years; racism; the INAO, French tax authorities, US shipping companies, the buying public and thousands more combine to suppress the irrepressible spirit of that man who was armed only with some promises and a barrel of Chambertin?

At cinemas near you from….well, who knows?"

Anyone fancy crowdfunding that one? :)

It would have to a bit more believable than that. :cool:
 
You are a terror, Ben. ;)
I agree with Tom that most films mentioned above are middling at best, but one I thought was a slight cut above was You Will Be My Son, a French film which came out six or seven years ago. Quite a serious drama.
 
I thought it was very interesting as it addressed the topic of the globalisation of wine and the phenomenon of flying winemakers, and especially Michel Roland and his formulaic approach to wine-making in order to get Parker points. Also his confession that he and Parker were very good friends. There was also an interesting interview with Aimé Guibert from Mas de Daumas Gaussac.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Yes, I rather enjoyed it despite its bias and despite badly needing edited down to half the length, but this was just my suggestion of a good movie for a group of 'normal' non-wine geeks who often went to the movies together. I think there was very, very little to hold their interest in it.
 
Yes, I rather enjoyed it despite its bias and despite badly needing edited down to half the length, but this was just my suggestion of a good movie for a group of 'normal' non-wine geeks who often went to the movies together. I think there was very, very little to hold their interest in it.
It's not so much that but the seasick-making camera work that is slightly problematic. I preferred the book!
 
It's not so much that but the seasick-making camera work that is slightly problematic. I preferred the book!
I usually like sitting close to the front of the cinema auditorium, but with the shaky camera-work of Mondovino it was a big mistake. I don't think it helped having to read the subtitles while the background moved.
 
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