I just don’t get burgundy

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Red Burgundy - no other Pinot quite compares
White Burgundy - no other Chardonnay quite compares
Champagne - no other sparkling wine quite compares
German Riesling - no other Riesling quite compares
Everything else from Europe - other things can compare

Is that the general consensus?
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
So, nobody sticking up for Bordeaux so far, so does that mean people think it it's not difficult to find other places that can do Bordeaux blends that equal Bordeaux?
 
So, nobody sticking up for Bordeaux so far, so does that mean people think it it's not difficult to find other places that can do Bordeaux blends that equal Bordeaux?
I think Bordeaux just about falls into the 'can't compare' category (at least for the left bank), but with rising alcohol levels and riper tannins the gap has narrowed significantly.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Had a vertical tasting of Vasse Felix's 'Tom Cullity' Cabernet blend the other day - every vintage made so far, which is only 5. It's very expensive, but also truly impressive and in many ways very Left Bank-like. They sent full bottles, so I was also able to enjoy at leisure with food, which only reinfoced the impression. Quite a Bordeaux-like maritimr climate snd 50-year-old vines, so quite unlike some other Cab regions I suppose.
 
Red Burgundy - no other Pinot quite compares
White Burgundy - no other Chardonnay quite compares
Champagne - no other sparkling wine quite compares
German Riesling - no other Riesling quite compares
Everything else from Europe - other things can compare

Is that the general consensus?
sooo many native Italian varieties that don't come close (or even exist) outside of Italy or outside of their main Italian region. Are there any examples of Nebbiolo, Sangiovese or Nerello Mascalese that can compare with those of Piemonte, Tuscany or Etna, to name just a few?
 
I’ve been interested in fine wine for 25 years, I have a small collection of grand cru burgundy because I know i should, line up for friend’s birthday drink this afternoon. The champagne is lovely the d’yquem is sublime but the burgundy? Yet another burgundy grand cru that is just so underwhelming, my only thought is I really must get round to listing my remaining “good” burgundy on vine-exchange. Am I missing something?
Maybe not Kevin, the most important factor in wine appreciation is always personal taste. Burgundy isn't for everyone, and the increasing expense and likelihood of disappointment make it harder to play the game, unless money is no object.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
sooo many native Italian varieties that don't come close (or even exist) outside of Italy or outside of their main Italian region. Are there any examples of Nebbiolo, Sangiovese or Nerello Mascalese that can compare with those of Piemonte, Tuscany or Etna, to name just a few?

I think you are cheating as there is no Nebbiolo, Sangiovese or Nerello outside of Italy is there? ;). I think we have to limit this game to grape varieties that are widely planted and widely available outside of their European homeland. So, if you are poised about to type "nothing compares to Armenian Voskehat," then save yourself the trouble :)
 
I think you are cheating as there is no Nebbiolo, Sangiovese or Nerello outside of Italy is there? ;). I think we have to limit this game to grape varieties that are widely planted and widely available outside of their European homeland. So, if you are poised about to type "nothing compares to Armenian Voskehat," then save yourself the trouble :)
Spoilsport! just as I was about to start extolling the unique virtues of Bobal and Trepat! ;) You did say 'Everything else from Europe' :D
I have had some Sangiovese from California and a couple of Nebbiolo from S Australia. Ok, but not in the same league. obviously.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Yes folks, no real need to list growers of those Italian varieties - you could just go to McLaren Vale and find all of them, plus Arneis, Trebbiano, Barbera, Fiano, etc., etc. as there's been something of an explosion of Italian varieties there and in several other southern hemisphere places. I was being a little bit tongue in cheek :)
 
I think Bordeaux just about falls into the 'can't compare' category (at least for the left bank), but with rising alcohol levels and riper tannins the gap has narrowed significantly.
Exactly. Right Bank Merlot seems, for me, to have lost its sense of place since the decades when I drank it, due to rising alcohol levels.
I think you are cheating as there is no Nebbiolo, Sangiovese or Nerello outside of Italy is there? ;). I think we have to limit this game to grape varieties that are widely planted and widely available outside of their European homeland. So, if you are poised about to type "nothing compares to Armenian Voskehat," then save yourself the trouble :)
I've been quite partial to some Aussie Nebbiolo's, though they are not, of course, Barolo lookalikes. But then neither are Valtellinas, and I quite like some of those.

When it comes to Grand Cru Burgundy they can, of course, be very hit and miss because producer, as we all know, is key.
 
20210726_120754.jpgSeaford Olympics
Ch. D yquem streaks a head to take gold place, quite possibly one of the finest wines I've ever had. Silver goes to the Champagne full of flavour, beautiful texture, everything just right. In 3rd place for Bronze goes to the Burgandy, to be honest this Burgandy was very pleased to only have 3 bottles in this contest, had there had been a forth, the Burgandy might have gone home medal free.
 
Red Burgundy - no other Pinot quite compares
White Burgundy - no other Chardonnay quite compares
Champagne - no other sparkling wine quite compares
German Riesling - no other Riesling quite compares
Everything else from Europe - other things can compare

Is that the general consensus?
Alsace Pinot Gris? :p

Although, being less mischievous, I would say I've never had a Gewurztraminer that can compare with the Alsace version.

Would agree to an extent on Riesling above. When the alcohol levels are less than 10% I would saying nothing compares with German, but once the levels increase, then its Alsace Riesling all the way for me.
 
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