NWR Kitchen scales

I had a Salter one that lasted decades but recently gave up the ghost. I replaced it with this
in December so I can't give a recommendation based on longevity, however it is easier to switch between units than the Salter, and at £8.49 is inexpensive.

I would have recommended the Salter up till December, but the same model is no longer available and I think that's going to be the problem with any recommendation. A digital device that has lasted years will be unlikely to be still available, having been replaced with a newer model.
 
Location
London
I have two, one which is good for say, weighing out 600g of flour and another which is ideal for measuring 12g of salt or even 2g of dried yeast which the other one couldn't cope with. The former is a John Lewis bog standard model and the latter is a Brifit one from Amazon and weighs grams to two decimal points, apparently.
 
I have two, one which is good for say, weighing out 600g of flour and another which is ideal for measuring 12g of salt or even 2g of dried yeast which the other one couldn't cope with. The former is a John Lewis bog standard model and the latter is a Brifit one from Amazon and weighs grams to two decimal points, apparently.
Be interesting to see what happens if you put the Brifit by the extractor Jim...
 
I've got a separate gram scale which weighs hundredths of a gram, an amazing bit of kit for under a tenner. I can only assume that its mass production and availability has been accelerated by a non-food sector of the market.
What I really want is a machine that has no objection at all to being drowned or dropped onto a stone floor, which may be wishful thinking.
Funnily enough, in the US we found that being in possession of a kitchen scale made people assume that you were involved in the distribution of illegal narcotics. American ingredients are typically measured by volume (or sticks, or whatever) rather than weight.

We had to buy friends of ours a scale in order for them to relive the joys of making Delia Smith’s pancake recipe.
 
I've got a separate gram scale which weighs hundredths of a gram, an amazing bit of kit for under a tenner. I can only assume that its mass production and availability has been accelerated by a non-food sector of the market.
What I really want is a machine that has no objection at all to being drowned or dropped onto a stone floor, which may be wishful thinking.
The algorithm agrees. I bought a similar item from a very large online vendor some years ago and it immediately suggested I might wish to buy several hundred very small zip-lock bags. I also have the same Salter that others have linked to. It has lasted many years, but has irritated me for most of that time.
 
The algorithm agrees. I bought a similar item from a very large online vendor some years ago and it immediately suggested I might wish to buy several hundred very small zip-lock bags. I also have the same Salter that others have linked to. It has lasted many years, but has irritated me for most of that time.
Nee nah, nee nah!! Is that the sound of sirens outside in your street Geoff?
 
We use this one which is great Precision Scale - 7,500 g / 0.1 g - LCD

Very accurate 0.1g plus can measure up to 7.5kg.

Originally bought it for balancing pistons and conrods for an A-Series engine I was building but it is now used in the kitchen.
Seriously hardcore. That may well be the solution.
I was reading a book on cocktails this morning and this passage seemed very relevant to this thread...View attachment 17602
Which book is that, Leon? I am impressed by the idea of cocktails that are accurate to a tenth of a gram.
 
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