NWR Kitchen Thread

Not sure this is the right thread BUT I recall the best way to cook game (grouse, partridges...) was to poach them, roast them and pan fried them. It was widely discussed on this forum or its previous version but I am unable to find details and/or a recipe. Would anyone be so kind and able to help me?
 
Not sure this is the right thread BUT I recall the best way to cook game (grouse, partridges...) was to poach them, roast them and pan fried them. It was widely discussed on this forum or its previous version but I am unable to find details and/or a recipe. Would anyone be so kind and able to help me?
Poach the bird in hot but not boiling water (60c or so I guess) for 3-4 minutes, remove and pat dry, into a hot pan to brown for 2 minutes and then a hot oven (220c) for 3-4 minutes to finish and rest. That will produce a reasonably rare grouse.
 
Poach the bird in hot but not boiling water (60c or so I guess) for 3-4 minutes, remove and pat dry, into a hot pan to brown for 2 minutes and then a hot oven (220c) for 3-4 minutes to finish and rest. That will produce a reasonably rare grouse.
Those temperatures and timings will result in a grouse that is indeed reasonably rare if one's name is Simon Grant.
 
We are about to move ahead with firmly initiating our plans for renovation in autumn next year. The info above is great.

I have been wondering about adding a steam oven but am not sure I would use it very frequently apart from for making bread. But even having it just for bread might be useful. (I have been in the habit of placing a tray of water on the oven floor when not baking bread in a Dutch oven, but worry that this might be damaging to the oven itself.)

Retirement is looming for me and one of the things I want to do more of when I have more time is expanding my cooking activities and trying new things, and it is largely this that is leading to the idea of adding a steam oven to our plans now.

Any views on steam ovens?
 
Love my steam oven. Use it almost every day. Brilliant with bread.
Thanks; what do you use it for apart for bread? I understand that it can be used for sous-vide, but that you still have to cook in plastic, which puts me off that method. So I am not sure if I would use it for anything other than bread over the long term. Still having an extra oven would always be useful for large scale cooking events


A friend with a new steam oven is rather disappointed, it doesn't work at high enough temperatures for breadmaking apparently.
Yes, I am concerned that it might be a waste of money. I am looking at the Miele and Wolf options, but expect that N. American models are very different from those in Europe
 
Last edited:
Which reminds me, I am going to install an induction hob. I hate the cooktops that don't have knob controls, but it seems that most induction cooktops have digital screen controls currently. If your fingers are covered in flour/oil, etc., I wonder how much of a pain these controls are to use. Also, I expect that they might be more likely to fail/have a shorter lifespan and be more difficult and costly to replace (don't know though). The Gaggenau induction cooktop here has knob controls and I like the look of it, but it seems not to be well-favoured here, not least because of the apparent lack of immediately available spare parts.

("Do you want an expensive cooktop? Yes, with knobs on")
 
Which reminds me, I am going to install an induction hob. I hate the cooktops that don't have knob controls, but it seems that most induction cooktops have digital screen controls currently. If your fingers are covered in flour/oil, etc., I wonder how much of a pain these controls are to use. Also, I expect that they might be more likely to fail/have a shorter lifespan and be more difficult and costly to replace (don't know though). The Gaggenau induction cooktop here has knob controls and I like the look of it, but it seems not to be well-favoured here, not least because of the apparent lack of immediately available spare parts.

("Do you want an expensive cooktop? Yes, with knobs on")
It can be a right PITA. I do quite like the magnetic knobs (I think Bosch sometimes do them) which seems like an honourable compromise.
 
Thanks; what do you use it for apart for bread? I understand that it can be used for sous-vide, but that you still have to cook in plastic, which puts me off that method. So I am not sure if I would use it for anything other than bread over the long term. Still having an extra oven would always be useful for large scale cooking events
The energy use alone suggests to me that using a sous vide machine to do sous vide is a better solution. But yes - two is the minimum number of ovens. We have four and I am really pleased.
Which reminds me, I am going to install an induction hob. I hate the cooktops that don't have knob controls, but it seems that most induction cooktops have digital screen controls currently. If your fingers are covered in flour/oil, etc., I wonder how much of a pain these controls are to use. Also, I expect that they might be more likely to fail/have a shorter lifespan and be more difficult and costly to replace (don't know though). The Gaggenau induction cooktop here has knob controls and I like the look of it, but it seems not to be well-favoured here, not least because of the apparent lack of immediately available spare parts.

("Do you want an expensive cooktop? Yes, with knobs on")
We have a Neff one with a magnetic puck - so called "twistpad". It's like a removeable knob, it's magnetic, and it's *awesome*.

Now there are lots of people online who seem to hate them - but for me, opening the drawer under the hob, taking the magnetic puck off the side (where it has been hanging due to the magnetic sides), and putting it on the hob...such a sense of satisfaction.
 
We kind of have 4 ovens. One biggish one that you can put a shelf in half way up which splits it into 2 separate ovens, a combI oven and a warming drawer. All Samsung and pleased with them so far. Just about can cope with Leon’s requirements!
 
Well @Thom Blach - i am prepared to accept that on the topic of cooking, even more than any other, anything upon which we disagree is something that i am wrong about. With that said - surely four is the minimum number of ovens? One for the meat, one for the potatoes, one for pudding and one to keep the plates warm?
I'd like a general keep warm oven, I must say, just as I'd like a freezer with varied coldness areas so that ice creams and sorbets could always be at the perfect temperature. I suppose I should do something about my primitive arrangements. I always feel that ovens are profligate for general cooking but I have probably got the fuel consumption figures wrong.
 
Well @Thom Blach - i am prepared to accept that on the topic of cooking, even more than any other, anything upon which we disagree is something that i am wrong about. With that said - surely four is the minimum number of ovens? One for the meat, one for the potatoes, one for pudding and one to keep the plates warm?
Sounds like you have an Aga like me.
 
I'd like a general keep warm oven, I must say, just as I'd like a freezer with varied coldness areas so that ice creams and sorbets could always be at the perfect temperature. I suppose I should do something about my primitive arrangements. I always feel that ovens are profligate for general cooking but I have probably got the fuel consumption figures wrong.
Ha funny you say that - since getting our smart meter I am using the ovens much less. I also found the sous vide was using even less energy than I though.

but i still get comfort from the fact that, at any time, I *could* cook meat and veg at different temperatures while making pudding and keeping the plates warm…
 
Top