Le Grappin Drinking

I meant to bring a 2013 Beaune Boucherottes up here with me, but grabbed a 2012 in error. I’m not sure this was a ready. Some tannins covering the wine’s delicate fruit.

As I think quite a few forumites buy Le Grappin I wonder whether a more general discussion on the drinking dates for all these wines might benefit the many?

I wonder what experience you might have had?
 
Not sure I can generalize David, but the straight SLBs, both red and white, seem to drink pretty well from the get go. That 2012 Beaune Boucherottes was also super on release (drunk twice early on), but may now be shutting down a bit - it definitely has the stuffing to age. I'm just about to drink the 2012 Beaune Greves blanc (it was stood up for Christmas Day but the assembled family wanted to go straight from champagne to reds). I'll report back when it's opened. Andrew himself says that all his wines are drinkable 2-3 years after the vintage at the most.
 
Unlike Richard I find a little time eases the villages Savignys - Andrew really makes some 'proper' wines - though the vintage will have quite some effect too. The 2011s to start were a little phenolic, not to mention a suggestion of ladybug in the red - but after about 3 years the phenolics in the white rounded out and it was drinking really very elegantly - likewise the red lost it's modest herbacousness and the pyrazine was close to undetectable in the same timeline - both drank very well from 2014 on and I finished them all at the start of this year I think.

The 12s were a little more gutsy yet I found easier to drink from the start. The villages I have long finished, likewise the Beaune Greves blanc which was a liitle on the oplulent side but delicious. I've still a few of the Boucherottes, and that's drinking okay - the nose is still a bit herby and young, but it's delicious in the mouth - certainly better with a little more patience.
 
FWIW, two notes from this year.
  • 2014 Le Grappin Savigny-lès-Beaune Blanc - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Savigny-lès-Beaune (12/11/2017)
    Pale; tight, intense, closed; dry, good extract & drive; taut finish. Best left alone for a couple of years. (90 pts.)
  • 2013 Le Grappin Santenay 1er Cru Gravières - France, Burgundy, Côte de Beaune, Santenay 1er Cru (20/07/2017)
    This is just about hitting its stride. Judiciously oaked, precise nervosity & verve. Driven finish. A conservative score. (91 pts.)
Posted from CellarTracker
 
I appreciate the wisdom. I love these wines but apart from buying sixBeaune Boucherottes 2012 I have been buying mixed cases, due to cost. So I have a spread of the following vintages but only a couple of each.
 
Some great observations already made. The parcel in Boucherottes on balance is more consistent year on year than the Aux Fourneaux parcel in Savigny; Boucherottes is a 1er cru vineyard first and foremost and a proportion of the parcel comprises very old vines (bunches always look great when you see them on the sorting table). It will benefit from cellaring for sure but it always tastes amazing on its fruit following release. I remember demolishing my 6 pack of 2013 Boucherottes very rapidly. The 2012 Boucherottes is more structured and out of the two vintages will repay longer cellaring.

The Savigny parcel (mostly village with a few rows of premier cru) can taste a little tougher on release and I agree with Bill that a few years of cellaring does benefit this Cuvée.
 
Recently both the SLB blanc 2013 and the Les Greves 2013 have been open for business, both a bit richer (opulent above is a good choice of descriptor) than expected, both very pleasant, lots of flavour and things to sniff. With the SLB I felt a bit more acid might help but that was during a long lunch so may be a tad unfair.
 
Recently both the SLB blanc 2013 and the Les Greves 2013 have been open for business, both a bit richer (opulent above is a good choice of descriptor) than expected, both very pleasant, lots of flavour and things to sniff. With the SLB I felt a bit more acid might help but that was during a long lunch so may be a tad unfair.
Interesting view Alistair. The SLB Blanc vineyards are quite high up in Savigny above the village and I've always found the acidity reasonably prominent (something I personally like in wines). Wonder whether it was a little warmer in the vineyards during that vintage that has suppressed the acidity a little; can't recall to be honest
 
Interesting view Alistair. The SLB Blanc vineyards are quite high up in Savigny above the village and I've always found the acidity reasonably prominent (something I personally like in wines). Wonder whether it was a little warmer in the vineyards during that vintage that has suppressed the acidity a little; can't recall to be honest
Agree that the SLBs and indeed Andrew's whites have a nice zip which likewise much appreciated. The wine was delicious and as I say it was just an impression during a long lunch, but any other thoughts very welcome. BTW I saw Andrew has included his guide to holding/drinking for past vintages in his latest offer letter. Re 2013, it was very late as I recall after being battered by rain and hail earlier so don't know the heat impact.
 
If i recall correctly, Andrew had to buy in some grapes in 2013 to make the Savigny blanc viable comercially. These were riper than he normally aims for and resulted in more tropical flavours in tank. Having tasted the wine since bottling, the flavours have settled but the wine is not entirely typical of his usual style.
If i have mixed up wines or vintages, hopefully the great man will come along to correct me.
 
Some great observations already made. The parcel in Boucherottes on balance is more consistent year on year than the Aux Fourneaux parcel in Savigny; Boucherottes is a 1er cru vineyard first and foremost and a proportion of the parcel comprises very old vines (bunches always look great when you see them on the sorting table). It will benefit from cellaring for sure but it always tastes amazing on its fruit following release. I remember demolishing my 6 pack of 2013 Boucherottes very rapidly. The 2012 Boucherottes is more structured and out of the two vintages will repay longer cellaring.

The Savigny parcel (mostly village with a few rows of premier cru) can taste a little tougher on release and I agree with Bill that a few years of cellaring does benefit this Cuvée.
I took a 13 to my parents this year and it was not only wonderful, but went down very well. That’s why I’d intended to take the same for Christmas. For my palate the 12 really does need longer.

I do remember Andrew saying to me once “drink the 13 whilst you wait for the 12”.
 
Also posted in the weekend tasting notes...

A glass of Andrew Nielsen's Beaune 1er cru Greves blanc 2012 is showing really well tonight - the color has evolved to a deeper yellow, still with a hint of green. The nose is quite bold and buttery with good depth and breadth on the palate. Plenty of ripe fruit here with some citrus and pain d'epices notes - almost lush in style. This is very much Beaune blanc. One to drink now I think, as it is very open and broad at the finish and slightly more evolved than I expected.
 
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