Make Wine Great Again

I'm not sure if this is a joke...

#respectwine: a worldwide campaign to prohibit the use of ice in wine

With the hashtag #respectwine the french restauranteur Alexandre Callet , nine years in Michelin Guide, launches a global campaign to promote respect for wine and the work of viticulturists. Including the goal of banning ice served in wine.

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With the worlds most famous soda can celebrating 100 years in France, Alexandre Callet, restaurateur in Paris, launches a global campaign now to promote a respectful consumption of wine, that prohibits the use of ice in the glass : Wine, if you truly love it, would never be drunk with ice.


Ice cubes, more dangerous to French wine than Trump

The enemy is not always the one we suspect. While the tax policies of Donald trump create a media frenzy, there is another danger at large for future generations: Ice cubes in wine.
With the hashtag #respectwine, Alexandre Callet launches a global campaign to promote a respectful consumption of an iconic product that we can’t drink with ice cubes like a soda.


The fight against "Ketchupisation"

"In the same way as we have begun to add ketchup to traditional dishes, putting ice cubes in a glass of wine is nonsense" explains, Alexandre Callet. “ With just a couple of degrees of difference, a fine bottle of wine can be ruined in seconds with ice cubes.” If we don’t respect the work, the quality of the wine will degrade. What is the point of recognising quality if we then add ice cubes. It is vital to protect the fastidious work of wine makers and the professionals of the global wine industry. We already have ‘JUNKFOOD’ and we are helping to create ‘jUNKWINE’” adds Alexandre Callet.


Global Communication Campaign

This initiative is supported by an important media campaign. Press releases have been distributed to all the major media outlets on five continents.

About Alexandre Callet

Alexandre Callet is a provoker of ideas and ardent defender of French food culture. He already engages in active global initiatives through world wide media engagement
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Have done it twice: once at Uluru resort where the red wine must have been 30C when served and once in Cairns in an outdoor restaurant when a jug full of ice turned to water in about 2 minutes, so next lot went straight into the wine glass :)
 
Last spring, a café here in Paris asked us if we wanted ice in the glasses of rosé that we ordered while sitting on the terrace. We declined and thought this was condescension to the fact that we were Americans. It turns out that there is now a newly-fashionable way of serving rosé here with ice cubes called a "piscine" (swimming pool). You're much more likely, I'm sure, to find French people than Americans drinking piscines.
 
I have several female friends who only drink wine with ice: they happily admit to not knowing a great deal about wine and they're not especially concerned to learn more about wine, but they all thoroughly enjoy their very cold and increasingly dilute glasses of sauvignon blanc or pinot grigio. It's certainly not for me to dictate their lifestyle choices and I suspect that they would be utterly disinterested by Alexandre Callet's opinions on the matter. :)
 
Two more thoughts on the matter...

Firstly the individuals mentioned above invariably decline anything richer in colour than villages Chablis, which leaves everything else (the likes of Puligny, Condrieu and Barsac) for less discerning palates – a heroic sacrifice on both sides.

And secondly why is Alexandre showing the red card to a glass of Ocean Spray?
 
I have asked for a glass of ice in London more than any other city. I mean, I at least try to be subtle about why I want the ice. But I’m not so good at subtle, so when busted, I generally ask if it’s really a good idea to store wine in a hot kitchen.
 
i occasionally drop a plastic reusable "icecube" in if the wine is too warm - has the benefit of dropping the temp, without melting and diluting the wine

Definitely - also very good for tasting samples both at room temperature then quickly at 'serving' temp to compare. Whatever happened to those giant quick bottle chilling machines from the Oddbins / Wine Rack days? Meant you could take anything off the shelves and cool it before buying.
 
Last spring, a café here in Paris asked us if we wanted ice in the glasses of rosé that we ordered while sitting on the terrace. We declined and thought this was condescension to the fact that we were Americans. It turns out that there is now a newly-fashionable way of serving rosé here with ice cubes called a "piscine" (swimming pool). You're much more likely, I'm sure, to find French people than Americans drinking piscines.

Look forwards to taking the piscine in due course... ;)
 
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