NWR Music Streaming

I second the Bluesound Node 2i. I have one connected to my 1990s NAD amp and Wharfedale diamonds. It was a noticeable step up from the Chromecast in terms of sound quality. The BlueOS is also a very good app. It lets me switch between my own digital library and Napster (which I use cos I get a premium package free with my mobile contract). It allows you to connect to Amazon, Deezer, Qobuz, Spotify, Tidal, TuneIn and among others (I like Radio Paradise when I can't be bothered to choose), all using the same, very reliable, interface. You can even flip to Napster when listening to an artist in your own library, to explore their other stuff. I like that feature.

It works well over WiFi, although I use a TP Link mesh. It doesn't have the fallout that I get on chromecast.

I've not used it with Roon. I got the impression that Roon has an additional monthly charge over the streaming service you use.

These are the other streamer boxes I considered.
Yamaha WXAD-10 (No optical output)
NAD M10 (includes an amp)
Cambridge Audio CXN V2 (no inbuilt wifi connection)
NAIM Unity Atom
 
Thanks all for the ideas. I’m thinking that the new Bluetooth standard might be good enough. Might give me an opportunity to buy an extra turntable for the study so that I can play my singles there and stream them around the house! :)
 
I'm now thinking that I'm going to either have to relocate my speakers to somewhere I'm allowed to listen to them (perhaps the garage/"cart lodge") or else get an upgrade to my car stereo and use that as a listening room!
 
SIngles?! By the time you've put them on and gone to another room, it'll nearly be time to rush back and take them off/turn them over!
Anyone remember piling up the records on a spindle above the turntable and the gramophone automatically playing them in succession? I had an overwhelming enthusiasm for popular music from about 1972 to 1975, then I discovered Stockhausen, really proper f*ck off music.
 
I don't know whether to post this one here or in the "little things that annoy you" thread, but I've now got a Esinkin Bluetooth receiver connected to my HiFi. I was listening to something on another bluetooth speaker (Beolit 15) just now (on an iPhone) and the signal kept going over to the Esinkin automatically.

I see that this is a common problem - eg. you're listening to something on Headphones, and someone outside starts the car - and the audio switches to the car!

Sounds like Apple have a problem here.
 
Anyone remember piling up the records on a spindle above the turntable and the gramophone automatically playing them in succession? I had an overwhelming enthusiasm for popular music from about 1972 to 1975, then I discovered Stockhausen, really proper f*ck off music.
Yes, what a great simple system it was for the time. About 1980 - 83 from memory.
May be the first post I fully understood in this thread.
 
I'm now thinking that I'm going to either have to relocate my speakers to somewhere I'm allowed to listen to them (perhaps the garage/"cart lodge") or else get an upgrade to my car stereo and use that as a listening room!
In car audio is usually excellent return on the bang for your buck scale.
I do find the full experience with your eyes closed presents some issues:D
 
Anyone remember piling up the records on a spindle above the turntable and the gramophone automatically playing them in succession? I had an overwhelming enthusiasm for popular music from about 1972 to 1975, then I discovered Stockhausen, really proper f*ck off music.
Thom,
My earlier playback devices being manufactured early- mid sixties all had thIs feature, along with mono sound.
I recall that you could not stack LP’s, though I of course tried with disastrous results.
I then started buying imported Beatles EP’s and though you got double the tracks the vinyl weight was some how different and often the spindle would drop more than one disc. One of my earliest remembered “One step forward two steps back” experiences.
 
Thom,
My earlier playback devices being manufactured early- mid sixties all had thIs feature, along with mono sound.
I recall that you could not stack LP’s, though I of course tried with disastrous results.
I then started buying imported Beatles EP’s and though you got double the tracks the vinyl weight was some how different and often the spindle would drop more than one disc. One of my earliest remembered “One step forward two steps back” experiences.
A friend's new CD is coming out on LP as well, but my urgent suggestion of an eight track cartridge version has not been successful. Definitely time for a revival, the in-car eight track cartridge machine was possible the most stylish music reproduction system of all time. The fact that it almost never functioned properly was its defining feature.
 
When I was a kid my our record player had settings for 45 and, amazingly, 78, as well. I liked listening to normal LPs set to 78 speed. This was very bad for the records, though, and for some reason the only one my parents would let me play this way - I think as they had no plans to ever listen to it themselves - was Hot Rats by Frank Zappa, which I much later discovered was actually considered a classic when heard at normal speed. It goes quite fast anyway, so what it must have been like at 2.5 times that and over an octave higher I can only imagine (although I guess I could easily find out digitally).
 
A friend's new CD is coming out on LP as well, but my urgent suggestion of an eight track cartridge version has not been successful. Definitely time for a revival, the in-car eight track cartridge machine was possible the most stylish music reproduction system of all time. The fact that it almost never functioned properly was its defining feature.
My cousins visited from Delaware in 1971 and took the trouble to bring with them an 8-Track car player, as a gift to their music loving cousin.
The fact that it was a “Lear Jet” branded model and had previously seen service in a Corvette brought a sense of sophistication to Dad’s Cortina mark II that few in the neighbourhood could begin to compete with.
 
Anyone remember piling up the records on a spindle above the turntable and the gramophone automatically playing them in succession? I had an overwhelming enthusiasm for popular music from about 1972 to 1975, then I discovered Stockhausen, really proper f*ck off music.

My first “record player” was (1970?) a one box portable player (speaker included) that had the spindle that you could load (I think) up to six records. My parents bought it for me as a Christmas present when our next door neighbours emigrated and gave me a selection of 7” singles (which I still have) and I had nothing to play them on. It lasted me well through my teenage years until I started work and managed to buy a “music centre” with a turntable, tuner and built in cassette player. I spent so much time in my bedroom listening to music in those days.
 
Location
London
I guess some people here must have some pretty high end headphones. Any particular recommendations?

I'm about to embark on this search. I asked my friends on FB (many of whom are musicians and, in particular, DJs) and the main recommendations were Sennheiser HD650 (balanced, relaxed) and Beyerdynamic DT-770 (bit more drive to them). I did a bit of research and decided I just needed to hear some, so I'm going to go to the Spiritland headphone shop for some demos soon. I think they have the HD650s, and a whole lot more expensive than that! I'm keen to try the Audeze and Focal ranges as well as Beyer and Senn.
 
I have a few pairs. One thing I’d say is really personal choice and only way to know is to try a few pairs.

DT 770 are closed, and probably my favourite and most used, although closed means better bass response, can be tiring to listen for long periods. I have 250 ohm versions which don’t show their best without a decent amp (although can just about run off an iPhone with volume limiter off). Got mine second hand, and everything is replaceable, on my third or fourth set of pads and treated myself to a new headband pad recently.

Closed means you can listen to a reasonable volume without disturbing others in same room.

HD600 are incredible to my ears but open and very detailed. I first listened as a teenager and was blown away at how good they were. You can’t listen with others in room as almost as much sound comes out as goes into your ears. Lots of updates since (650, 660) so worth listening and investigating.

Head-fi has more information than you ever wanted to know about headphones. What is good is there is a frequency response graph which I found helpful when you like a sound signature to know what’s similar. I really liked Denon when starting out.

if you can bear in ear canal (IEMs) the Flare Audio ones are ridiculously good to my ears for not much money. I don’t like the microphonic effect of the cord when walking, can’t bear talking when I have a good seal, but can’t get true wireless earbuds I’ve tried to stay in.

One benefit for me with IEMs is that you don’t get as sweaty ears, which are uncomfortable for me over about 22°C. Closed are much worse than open for over ears and pleather pads are less absorbent than velour but can change sound signature.

Wireless doesn’t compare to wired & amped for me but HD4.50BT SE for the train and office were great value (prime day 2018) and still used, but on ear and can get uncomfortable for long periods. Similarly Jabra Move were comfortable and inexpensive when on offer but I switched for noise cancelling which is really helpful.
 
I have 650’s.

“balanced, relaxed” is not a bad two word summation. To expand further “accurate precise mids, treble gently rolled off, bass a touch light and a bit vague”. The bass I only realised was such when I bought the 8C’s, until then I thought them pretty good in that department.

I’ve listened to various Audeze’s but found them all somewhat akin to 1970’s Jaguars (posh, powerful but somewhat ridiculous. Oh and like wearing a block of concrete on your head), various Beyers (all bass and treble, both at the same time, yet somehow airy - a bizarre combination) and various Focal’s (house sound full of high end sizzle).

As with wine, sound (and sound perception) is very personal so the above observations are only my opinion based upon my own physiology and experiences.
 
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Location
London
My friend who has HD-650 seems to have a similar view to you, Mark - he said:

"The 20odd year old HD650 are still my favourite headphone...

I’ve had all kinds, Grado’s, AKG, Beyerdynamic, Sony, Bowers & Wilkins, pffff, I have forgotten to be honest - some crazy money set-ups that went on eBay long ago.

My ear likes HD650’s and my wallet likes the availability of service parts.

For home listening I cannot give them any higher praise.

Doesn’t matter what they are plugged into either. Big valve power Musical Fidelty Amps, or an audioquest DAC dongle, or even my still have a plug smartphone.

I can and do spend hours listening with them.

I’ve had some much more expensive Grado’s- I forget the model now - wooden things - I just found them tiring.

They have great detail, space, attack, dynamics and all that stuff... but it all gets too much, my head had enough of it They never sound real or as easy to ignore as the HD650’s."

My friends who recommended Beyers are all heavily into dance music.
 
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