NWR new zero tolerance covid thread

4 out of 5 hospitalizations are for the unvaccinated, so I think we need to act on the data and restrict the movements of the unvaccinated. It's a real problem and we need to address it.

This is incorrect.


36% of Covid hospital patients are unvaccinated, not 80%.

Vaccines do appear to be helpful in preventing hospitalisation, but we ought to get the stats correct.
 
Really? The last time I had a lunge problem I was able to treat it with just some vigorous stretching.

It's an oxygen overpressure therapy in Lower Saxony at the "Druckkammer Zentrum" Here is the complete video about "Long-Covid". For you the interesting part starts at 24.00

 
Another alternative treatment is blood cleaning. Here is an English doctor coming to Germany. It's in English this part. Starting 24:00

 
I know Russ, but I don't think we've gone far enough. I know there are legitimate debates about freedom of choice, but in this case the unvaccinated are choosing to overwhelm the NHS and endanger the health of other (vaccinated) people who do not have access to treatment for illnesses other than Covid. That seems to me to be very, very unfair.
That is really astonishing, given that >>80% of the most vulnerable are vaccinated.
Just goes to show how effective the vaccine is.
Except that the stat is incorrect.

Whilst vaccines seem the sensible choice for most people, especially the vulnerable, I don’t agree with compulsory vaccination.

After all there are plenty of lifestyle choices that are essentially also health choices, which result in the NHS being overwhelmed.

Perhaps we ought to have mandatory diets for the obese.
Forced exercise for the bone idle.
Rations on alcohol purchases.
Etc etc
 
Fortunately, obesity, idleness and alcoholism aren't directly contagious.

That isn’t the point being made though Bryan. The point was about hospitals being overwhelmed by people’s health choices, thus preventing others from getting treatment.

In that respect obesity, idleness and alcoholism are far greater problems than Covid.

Transmission is a totally different argument, and the vaccines aren’t particularly good at preventing transmission.
 
Unfortunately, whilst a recent double-Pfizer offers 93% protection against symptomatic Delta, the best estimate so far (that I've seen) suggests it's only 30% effective at preventing symptomatic Omicron :oops:
Where is that number coming from? Pfizer apparently told media this:

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"Jefferies said in a note the 25-fold decline in antibodies flagged by Pfizer in a two-dose vaccine regime against Omicron implied that it would provide only modest protection against infection, with vaccine efficacy falling to around 60 per cent for the new variant. The BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine was 95 per cent against the original virus strain."

60% against symptomatic Omicron is actually not that bad, some other vaccine (Johnson? Sinovac?) has about that against original strain.
 
Location
London
I thought you are not much older than me! I haven't got any msg from NHS.
I didn't either, but as from yesterday you can book online if (i) your second jab was over two months ago, (ii) the date of the third jab will be three months or longer after the second, (iii) you're 40 or over.

I think they're about to drop condition (iii) - as from Monday iirc.

I could have got an appointment next day (i.e. today) but didn't want to risk side-effects ruining tomorrow!
 
I'm sorry to say lifestyle changes have been negative for me, in terms of not getting out and about nearly as much as I used to.
I have become a more powerful, and heavier cyclist. The two appear to have almost perfectly balanced out.

One silver lining though has definitely been a much more intentional approach to my personal relationships and friendships, which I suppose in a way counts as a positive lifestyle choice. I also never suffer from jetlag these days :)
 
I'm sorry to say lifestyle changes have been negative for me, in terms of not getting out and about nearly as much as I used to.
I'm sorry to hear that Bryan. Our movements and socialising have dropped markedly as well.
I was more asking if people have changed their diet (added things in / cut things out), alcohol consumption, exercise routines, hydration, etc. Anything specifically for their mental and/or physical health as a response to this pandemic.
Cheers
 
I'm sorry to hear that Bryan. Our movements and socialising have dropped markedly as well.
I was more asking if people have changed their diet (added things in / cut things out), alcohol consumption, exercise routines, hydration, etc. Anything specifically for their mental and/or physical health as a response to this pandemic.
Cheers
Less cycling, more dog walks with Rocket. Reverted to no mid-week drinking, after a Covid induced two month splurge last year. Hydration - very rarely go to the pub, nowadays.
Currently not sleeping well: recurring nightmare of England losing to Australia at cricket.
 
I didn't either, but as from yesterday you can book online if (i) your second jab was over two months ago, (ii) the date of the third jab will be three months or longer after the second, (iii) you're 40 or over.

I think they're about to drop condition (iii) - as from Monday iirc.

I could have got an appointment next day (i.e. today) but didn't want to risk side-effects ruining tomorrow!

I’d worry that the Side effects would kick in just as the wine does. Either way it’s will be fun.
Hope you enjoy it.
 
It's also viciously ill-intentioned covid-denying nonsense to suggest that covid only seriously affects the obese, the idle and the drunk.
I don't know many who have had covid, around a dozen folk. Of the 2 with long covid, one is a fit ( tennis coach, runner ) age 21, and the other is a marathon runner in their 50's. I know high exercise levels can diminish your immune system, but long covid has hit these two hard. I strongly disagree with the premise that society is "panicking" about the impact of covid.
 
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