NWR new zero tolerance covid thread

I had an email saying book your jab - not because I am over 50 but because of my medical history - then the same experience as you dan so I simply said I was in the high risk category when it became an option and all done.
 
All the news sites have reported that all over 50 year olds are entitled to another jab now. However, when you go to the NHS website to book one it asks you a series of questions as well as whether you're over 50. A no to those other questions results in a message saying you're not entitled to another jab?! ie you not only have to be over 50 but must be immune compromised, looking after someone who is etc etc

I have had the same issue, Dan. When you Google it parts of the NHS sites mirror the media reports but for booking you either have to be over 65 or have other requirements to meet.
 
Just back from Virus Assembly Symposium, which is arguably the top structural biology- virology event. This year we had about half of talks related to coronavirus research, understandably (during 2020-2021 most of virology labs were semi-forced to focus on coronavirus study, either due to funding or lockdown rules). Some really amazing results, including viewing coronavirus budding under cryo-ET, and seeing how different vaccines produce different conformations of spike protein in the target cells. Virology research in the past three years not only didn't slow down, but actually lifted to a new level, with a lot cross-fields cooperation among structural biology, proteomics, immunology and gene analysis. All these will surely be the fundation for the swift response for the next pandemic, just like SARS and MERS studies made the swift solving on SARS-Cov2 spike protein structure in 2020 possible. To achieve that, we need continuous public concern and support (including funding, of course).
This panademic is not fully over, and there eventually will be next one to come. It would be a real pity to strand the progress scientists have made in the past three years.

p.s. On the side note, virologists are human beings and conferences are also social gatherings. Even virology conference can spread Covid... My colleague just tested positive! Luckily I am not yet, possibly thank to the July infection antibody.
 
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Just back from Virus Assembly Symposium, which is arguably the top structural biology- virology event. This year we had about half of talks related to coronavirus research, understandably (mainly due to 2020-2021 most of virology labs were semi-forced to focus on coronavirus study, either due to funding or lockdown rules). Some really amazing results, including viewing coronavirus budding under cryo-ET, and seeing how different vaccines produce different conformations of spike protein in the target cells. Virology research in the past three years not only didn't slow down, but actually lifted to a new level, with a lot cross-fields cooperation among structural biology, proteomics, immunology and gene analysis. All these will surely be the fundation for the swift response for the next pandemic, just like SARS and MERS studies made the swift solving on SARS-Cov2 spike protein structure in 2020 possible. To achieve that, we need continuous public concern and support (including funding, of course).
This panademic is not fully over, and there eventually will be next one to come. It would be a real pity to strand the progress scientists have made in the past three years.
Your enthusiasm makes me hopeful!
 
Your enthusiasm makes me hopeful!
I’m not so hopeful. I probably don’t know the full extent of funding and operations but it doesn‘t seem positive,
I remember the UK building vaccine production and research centres so we aren’t reliant on other countries again.
It was sold off before opening just this year.

There is still the teeside site I believe, which was new. Other testing and research funding has been stopped, and of course we don’t need the same levels as pandemic, but I don’t have much confidence in political decisions these days.

It does go to show what we can do when all the money and resources are thrown at a problem.
 
I’m not so hopeful. I probably don’t know the full extent of funding and operations but it doesn‘t seem positive,
I remember the UK building vaccine production and research centres so we aren’t reliant on other countries again.
It was sold off before opening just this year.

There is still the teeside site I believe, which was new. Other testing and research funding has been stopped, and of course we don’t need the same levels as pandemic, but I don’t have much confidence in political decisions these days.

It does go to show what we can do when all the money and resources are thrown at a problem.
As long as UK afford to buy it in, I don't mind where it's made. My optimism is about virological science making progress worldwide.
 
As long as UK afford to buy it in, I don't mind where it's made. My optimism is about virological science making progress worldwide.
Agree with Jeremy. There is doubtless a valuable discussion to be had in the other place…put in terms of the advancement of science, and the ability of humans to create new vaccines - this is just amazing. It’s easy to lose sight of just how much progress is being made. Humans truly are wonderful.
 
I don't know about other news outlets, but this is what the BBC News website says.....
Who can have an autumn booster?

A further dose is available to:
  • adults aged 50 and over
  • people aged five to 49 with health conditions which put them at higher risk - including pregnant women
  • care home staff
  • frontline health and social care workers
  • carers aged 16 to 49
  • household contacts of people with weakened immune system
Not everyone can book immediately. People aged 50 to 64 years old may not be able to book until later in the autumn.
 
As long as UK afford to buy it in, I don't mind where it's made. My optimism is about virological science making progress worldwide.
Yes true. If we remember there was a real issue with supply and demand hence the requirement to ramp up UK production ability for this and other vaccines In the future. The Billingham site is still active it looks like so we are in a better place than before.
 
I'm over 65 and a 4-6 weeks back I got a text saying I could have my booster. Didn't need to book just went down to the City Hall, my nearest Vaccination centre, and seen straight away. The health conditions that put you at higher risk from Covid seems a bit hit and miss to me. My wife who has asthma is still waiting her turn (62) whereas our eldest daughter (24) has had a text saying she can have a booster now, we think because she is a carrier of the Thalassemia gene, because otherwise she is in fine health.
 
As long as UK afford to buy it in, I don't mind where it's made. My optimism is about virological science making progress worldwide.
Saying that, it would be rather sad if the United Kingdom, the home country of Alexander Fleming, Joseph Lister and Edward Jenner, would leave the research front end for other countries to be in charge of.

It also worth reminding that the reason UK secured more vaccine than other European countries in the early stage, is because ChAdOx1 was developed by Oxford University, and there was a deal between the funding body, developer and company. If the Oxford group was not already doing MERS vaccine study, they won't be the first to pass the line, and British will need to buy vaccine developed by American, German, or Chinese. If there is no vaccine, then there is no successful vaccine rollout, which some politicians take it so naturally as their own credit. Just like why Moderna can generate SARS-Cov2 S protein mRNA in weeks, is because other fundamental research scientists already paved the way by doing tons of work on other viruses.

“Our ability to get this particular structure was based upon all our prior knowledge from working on HKU1 and MERS and SARS,” says McLellan.
 
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Saying that, it would be rather sad if the United Kingdom, the home country of Alexander Fleming, Joseph Lister and Edward Jenner, would leave the research front end for other countries to be in charge of.

It also worth reminding that the reason UK secured more vaccine than other European countries in the early stage, is because ChAdOx1 was developed by Oxford University, and there was a deal between the funding body, developer and company. If the Oxford group was not already doing MERS vaccine study, they won't be the first to pass the line, and British will need to buy vaccine developed by American, German, or Chinese. If there is no vaccine, then there is no successful vaccine rollout, which some politicians take it so naturally as their own credit. Just like why Moderna can generate SARS-Cov2 S protein mRNA in weeks, is because other fundamental research scientists already paved the way by doing tons of work on other viruses.

“Our ability to get this particular structure was based upon all our prior knowledge from working on HKU1 and MERS and SARS,” says McLellan.
Agreed. My optimism was about research not manufacturing.
 
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Not to argue whether fundamental research or manufacturing more important, just we should keep in mind how high-tech manufacture nowadays heavily rely on educated human resource who hold research degree. Take TSMC (arguably the most important semiconductor company in the world) for an example, 80% of their managers and engineers have MSc or PhD degree in the related field, which means they all have research experiences and ability. I don't assume biotech manufacture is much different.

To produce stable quality vaccine products itself can be a big research project which needs many PhD and MSc to accomplish. If there is not enough research and high education investiment, the manufacturing unit cannot stand by itself, at least it cannot be anything other than low profit foundry.
 
Not to argue whether fundamental research or manufacturing more important, just we should keep in mind how high-tech manufacture nowadays heavily rely on educated human resource who hold research degree. Take TSMC (arguably the most important semiconductor company in the world) for an example, 80% of their managers and engineers have MSc or PhD degree in the related field, which means they all have research experiences and ability. I don't assume biotech manufacture is much different.

To produce stable quality vaccine products itself can be a big research project which needs many PhD and MSc to accomplish. If there is not enough research and high education investiment, the manufacturing unit cannot stand by itself, at least it cannot be anything other than low profit foundry.
Firstly - as I've ranted before - is TSMC the most geopolitically important company since the East India Company? Secondly - i guess a lot depends on the specific vaccine manufacturer. TSMC is different from other semiconductor companies in that it consistently innovates on the manufacturing process in order to make chips for other companies. The innovation imperative for them is kinda unique in the world. I really have no understanding of the knowledge needed for vaccine manufacture, but would could imagine that *not* needing that level of research knowledge and expertise would in fact be a good sign.
 
I really have no understanding of the knowledge needed for vaccine manufacture, but would could imagine that *not* needing that level of research knowledge and expertise would in fact be a good sign.
If the goal is the swiftly develop and produce good quality and quantity new vaccine for the future new pandemic, then it absolutely needs top research knowledge, which even* Taiwan couldn't offer.

If this country is satisfied with making vaccines which are already in the market for decades, then probably not (not saying it's easy, remember the big UK lateral flow test manufacture plan? It ended up with none of the product qualified to be used), but I don't think that kind of vaccine was what people have in mind when we talked about "vaccine developing and manufacturing" in 2020-2021, and I don't see a chance the UK can compete with many other countries on the cost.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
One bad reaction from a pal who had the double vax last week - in fact a triple vax as it was flu plus Moderna and Phizer combined. He reacted badly to previous vaxs too though, and his other half was OK with only the usual achey arm at the injection site.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
My wife's saying that she doesn't want to risk flu & covid booster simultaneously. I'll likely follow her lead!

Alex, the beauty of living in a tiny village is that 'big city' rules don't seem to apply, so I could walk into our pharmacy last week and have the flu jab, even though officially the guidance is to wait for the double vax appointment at a health centre. Chatting to the pharmacist and he said he didn't fancy the double jab either and would be having them separately. He didn't expand on reasons other than personal preference, which is a bit like me too: I know quite a few who've had the double vax, and most have been fine.
 
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