No Age Statement Whisky

Some of my favourite recent single malts are nas. In my opinion there are some excellent ones out there.

These are the ones I’ve particularly enjoyed recently

An Cnoc Blas
Glen Scotia Double Cask
Ardmore Legacy
Laphroaig Quarter Cask
 
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I'm not keen on NAS as a point of principle, I think that switching from hard data to marketing concepts is wrong, and in the information age a real backwards step. However, that doesn't necessarily make it all bad whisky, laphroaig triple wood and nikka straight from the barrel are a couple of my favourites.
 
Location
London
1/4 Cask is great, as are Ardbeg Corryvreckan and Uigedeal.

I can't think of a non-peated NAS I particularly rate. I have enjoyed Aberlour A'Bunadh but that's apparently gone downhill as the whisky used has got younger.
 
Nas is one of my favourite NY rappers!

Whisky-wise I try and avoid NAS although there are good examples as Nick has mentioned above. I also like good producer sherry-bomb NAS whiskies such as Glenfarclas 105 (60% ABV!!) and also before the price hike I used to like Aberlour A'bundadh.
 
Go back in time ie before the 1980s and most single malts were bottled without an age statement or at a youthful 6,7,8 years old. Longer aged whisky with an age statement of 10, 12, 15, 18+ years were a luxury and came into their own from the 1980s at a time when whisky sales had slumped and quite a few distilleries were closing.
 
Another which I’ve just tried and really liked is Glenglassaugh Torfa.

This highland distillery was mothballed from 1986-2006 but was then sold and is now making whisky again. Slightly sweet spirit profile but with some fine peat smoke, works well. Bottled at 50% not chill filtered and natural colour. I look forward to seeing how this develops now the bottle has been started.
 
Longrow Peated is decent as well
I've heard that it is more than decent, a replacement or successor of their earlier Longrow CV that was very well received.

Another one that is pretty decent, though only a blend, is the Cutty Sark 'Prohibition Blend' that is bottled at 50% alcohol. Between this and the Islay Mist 8, which is based on a good dollop of Laphroaig, I have found my cheap standby whiskies.

Mahmoud.
 
I have just ordered Arran Sherry Cask NAS 55.8% as a blind roll of the dice as the natural presentation appeals and the provenance of the casks appears to be first rate so I am confident that I will find it interesting and quite possibly like it a lot. I have been searching for sherry bomb NAS whiskies that are a bit more reasonably priced. My previous go-to's were Aberlour A'bunadh (until it doubled in price) and also Glenfarclas 105 which they used to sell in 1L bottles for about £45 (no longer the bargain it used to be). I do miss the 105 something very satisfying about it - maybe I am drawn to the uncompromising concentration from the 60% ABV (105 imperial proof) and fond memories of it finishing off a nice meal with a cigar in hand!
 
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The Arran Sherry Cask sounds very promising Graeme. I have also grown to like cask strength whiskies and their undiluted flavour profile. I have not had the Glenfarclas 105 in quite sometime but will make amends if I get the chance.

Canadian whiskey tends to be on the sweeter side and not because of any sherry influence. I am usually not a fan of the style. However, there are exceptions, and one of them is an all rye expression from Alberta Premium bottled at cask strength. The first ever cask strength release was in 2019 and it was given the nod as the world's best whiskey of 2020 by Jim Murray. I was fortunate to have tasted it and acquired an extra couple of bottles before the award was announced and, not surprisingly, completely sold out. That release was bottled at 65.1%. The second release was bottled at 66% and though it too was quickly sold out I was fortunate to have found a single bottle in a store in our local China town. If we were living in the same town I would love to have shared it with you.

Cheers ....................................................... Mahmoud.

[Edited to remove a redundancy.]
 
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The Arran Sherry Cask sounds very promising Graeme. I have also grown to like cask strength whiskies and their undiluted flavour profile. I have not had the Glenfarclas 105 in quite sometime but will make amends if I get the chance.

Canadian whiskey tends to be on the sweeter side and not because of any sherry influence. I am usually not a fan of the style. However, there are exceptions, and one of them is an all rye expression from Alberta Premium bottled at cask strength. The first ever cask strength release was in 2019 and it was given the nod as the world's best whiskey of 2020 by Jim Murray. I was fortunate to have tasted it and acquired an extra couple of bottles before the award was announced and, not surprisingly, completely sold out. That release was bottled at 65.1%. The second release was bottled at 66% and though it too was quickly sold out I was fortunate to have found a single bottle in a store in our local China town. This one is bottled at 66% alcohol. If we were living in the same town I would love to have shared it with you.

Cheers ....................................................... Mahmoud.
I need to keep the possibility of picking up some Canadian whiskey on the horizon somewhere as it sounds v interesting. Also the ABVs quoted for the Alberta Premium are something else ! Wowzers.

My view on sherry-bombs is that you need to have at least one or ideally two options for your home bar so that you can scratch that itch when the urge to do so requires. I also think the cask strength presentations provide a lot more interest and complexity too.
 
Another good one tried recently, Aberlour Casg Annamh, batch 2. This comes in at 48% and is non chill filtered. I tasted it alongside the 12 yo and 14yo double cask and it was the one I liked best by some margin. Matured in a mix of European oak sherry casks, and both bourbon and sherry American oak casks.
 
I have just ordered Arran Sherry Cask NAS 55.8% as a blind roll of the dice as the natural presentation appeals and the provenance of the casks appears to be first rate so I am confident that I will find it interesting and quite possibly like it a lot. I have been searching for sherry bomb NAS whiskies that are a bit more reasonably priced.
Update - this whisky is as good as I had hoped and well worth picking up.
 
Recently found that the NAS Glenlivet is absolutely excellent for making a Highball (and I use plenty of ice and San PG for the soda / sparkling water).

Anyone else drink Highballs / whisky sodas ? If so which whisky do you use, and how about the sparkling water?
 
Honestly, I have to say that I do not drink highballs, and only consider NAS whiskys that I can drink neat. Right now, as I write, I am sipping on an NAS Highland Park 'Magnus', something I picked up for something like 15 or 16 pounds. Although a bit light (only 40%), it has sufficient character to make it interesting.

Mahmoud.
 
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