Return of the silly little things that annoy you thread

Where did this idea of calling wine "juice" come from, and why does it seem to persist? Is it an affectation of an American/Australian critic, maybe?

On the one hand, wine and juice simply are not synonyms. Juice is fermented and becomes wine. Nothing against juice: I've had some delicious grape juices, but they're not the same thing. If it's okay to call wine juice, what do you call juice?

On the other hand, juice has more characters than wine, and is surely (if only a tiny bit) harder to spell when typing/tapping.
 
Where did this idea of calling wine "juice" come from, and why does it seem to persist? Is it an affectation of an American/Australian critic, maybe?

On the one hand, wine and juice simply are not synonyms. Juice is fermented and becomes wine. Nothing against juice: I've had some delicious grape juices, but they're not the same thing. If it's okay to call wine juice, what do you call juice?

On the other hand, juice has more characters than wine, and is surely (if only a tiny bit) harder to spell when typing/tapping.

I guess you don't like Mondays, Andrew? :)
 
As an American, and therefore guilty of Americanisms, I think it is fun to refer to wine as juice on occasion, to avoid repetition and to give a fun dimension to a subject that is often taken far too seriously.

That being said, I don't call guys "dudes" or girls "chicks" :).

I think it's good to be eclectic and have adopted some Britishisms that seem to suit, even ones that aren't in the dictionary.
One I can think of is "vanillary".

I'd be interested to know: do you ever encounter a problem understanding tasting notes in American English?
Certainly, Robert Parker's writing style is/was very different from the English critics.
I can't imagine an Englishman saying, for instance, "gobs of fruit", but I assume the idea come across clearly.
Or does it?

Best regards,
Alex R.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
I can't imagine an Englishman saying, for instance, "gobs of fruit", but I assume the idea come across clearly.
Or does it?

No, "gobs of" anything is not something I have ever heard a British person (which is a kind of Englishman but with gobs more regions included) say, but at the same time it does work in suggesting (warning about?) what style to expect.
 
I've only started noticing it (not to the point of being irritated though, yet) in the last couple of years and assumed it was something to do with the so-called cult of natural wine. Only last week in a coffee shop in the City I really did hear the bewhiskered barista say to a customer, "Hey mate, that pet nat you tipped me last week was great juice. Usual cold brew?"
 
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