Return of the silly little things that annoy you thread

A family member of mine turned up for a long international flight a whole day late, once. The flight was at 12:10am on a certain day which meant you had to be there the day before, of course. Easy mistake.
That one is real easy to mess up. Quite a few BKK to LHR flights leave after midnight and people get it wrong all the time. Airlines could do better in flagging it.
 
Road mainenance lorries parked in the cul de sac where I live, vissible from our windows and with amber lights flashing like a Christmas tree on steriods, as one is now. I think my annoyance is partly explained by being a bit out on "the spectrum".

Similarly - cars stationary for a long time in a queue of traffic, right in front of our car, with brake lights glaring, apparently ignorant of hand brakes. And of course most cars these days seem to need the third high-level brake light, at my eye-level, but not quite high enough you block with the windscreen shade thingy.
 
Similarly - cars stationary for a long time in a queue of traffic, right in front of our car, with brake lights glaring, apparently ignorant of hand brakes. And of course most cars these days seem to need the third high-level brake light, at my eye-level, but not quite high enough you block with the windscreen shade thingy.
That’s one I find really annoying, too.
 
Google and everything to do with their "smart" doorbell, which seems to be showing how "unsmart" I am...

- The fact that instructions are QR code-derived video only
- The fact you have to use the app (and subsequent confusion around "Home" and Nest")
- The fact that my wife's app doesn't pick up the device even when "inviting" her to join the household
- The fact that when the doorbell is pressed, nothing shows up on my Home Hub device in spite of Google's promise that it would, and there doesn't appear to be any way of finding out why, or what to do about it...
- But mostly, that you seem to have to set up multiple accounts under different names for just about every aspect of life...

Tearing my non-existent hair out...
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
A family member of mine turned up for a long international flight a whole day late, once. The flight was at 12:10am on a certain day which meant you had to be there the day before, of course. Easy mistake.

I think I've confessed my almost identical experience before, but it was compounded by the fact I was flying First class to Australia, on someone else's money of course, as the guest international judge at a prestigious wine competition. I grew increasingly annoyed by the stupid BA website that wouldn't let me check in 24 hours before the flight, only to learn when I arrived at the airport next morning that I was 24 hours late. My blood literally ran cold standing there. So back home and an incredibly embarrassing call to the organiser to try to explain myself (simply put the wrong date in my diary from the word go). I asked them to decide if they still wanted me, and they said 'yes' which meant booking me a whole new return ticket (if you don't take the outward leg of a return flight, the return is invalidated). God knows how much that cost them.

I arrived in Canberra around 9am after a 24 hour journey via four flights, and as I walked into the hotel where the judging was taking place was handed a white coat and clipboard, before settling down to taste 140 brand new Rieslings. I only got to my room around 8pm as we all went straight to dinner and I felt I couldn't pull out :)
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Having a car with an automatic gearbox, I must admit guilt m'lud. However, now knowing how much it annoys the driver behind, I must fit brighter brake lights :)

My terribly clever Volvo puts on the brakes automatically when you come to a stop and cuts the engine. It also warns you if the traffic ahead begins to move and you don't. Technology is making it harder and harder to annoy people behind you :)
 
I too have recently been googling smart doorbell. Many of the features looked great, but I would like an additional feature - that when someone presses the button it closes an electrical circuit that rings a literal bell. The impression I got was that to get a noise that sounds like a bell in the house, you need to rely on an app, working WiFi, and a smart speaker.

I really hope that at some point society realises the value of simplicity and reliability. And when I say simplicity, I don't mean an iPhone with a touch screen; I mean something with real switches and dials, with clear functions, and which work as expected.

The "big red switch" at the side of the old IBM PCs was an excellent example. You could see and feel the switch to find out if the machine was on or off, and there was no chance of using it accidentally as it went on/off with some resistence and a satisfying clunk. A couple of decades ago, I once thought I was switching a computer on first thing in the morning by pressing a button, when in fact I switched it off as it had been left on overnight running a large model, the results of which were lost by my switching it off.
 
@Andrew Bajorek ... for this very reason we have a low tech bell that is quite literally a bell.
My parents, before they died, got one of the early wireless bells so no bother with google setup, and I'm still using it until I get round to selling their house - but it's still not perfect; sometimes it doesn't ring - and occasionally it'll ring when there's no-one there...
At my house I've kept the original bell connected with wires - but even that's not perfect as half the delivery drivers persist in not using it, and they don't knock nearly hard enough for the sound to travel through two doors to the kitchen 10 metres away.
 
My terribly clever Volvo puts on the brakes automatically when you come to a stop and cuts the engine. It also warns you if the traffic ahead begins to move and you don't. Technology is making it harder and harder to annoy people behind you :)
My not-so-smart Skoda had an annoying "collision risk alert" alarm that goes off at apparently random times. Yesterday it sounded to warn us that it wasn't working.

Of course the one time we did have a serious risk of collision, as a car slid into our path from a side road in icy conditions, forcing us to take evasive action, it kept silent.
 
"Award-winning" where the award is not specified. If the subject has won something meaningful like a Nobel prize or a Booker prize, well, you're definitely going to tell us. Otherwise we're going to assume it's a Mickey Mouse award. So if you're not prepared to specify, STFU.

Phil David, award-winning Wine Pages forumite.
 
"Award-winning" where the award is not specified. If the subject has won something meaningful like a Nobel prize or a Booker prize, well, you're definitely going to tell us. Otherwise we're going to assume it's a Mickey Mouse award. So if you're not prepared to specify, STFU.
Are there any butchers that don't have award-winning sausages? Not only are the awards not specified, but it is unclear which of their sausages won them.

On the subject of butchers, what does "family butchers" mean? Is it a family-owned business, do they sell to families, or do they actually butcher families? I'm tempted to assume the last, as I can't remember seeing "family newsagents" or "family grocers".
 
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My terribly clever Volvo puts on the brakes automatically when you come to a stop and cuts the engine. It also warns you if the traffic ahead begins to move and you don't. Technology is making it harder and harder to annoy people behind you :)
Ah, but does it stop the brake light from activating? My car does something similar in that it makes noises and flashes an image of a car on the dash if it 'thinks' I'm getting too close to the car in front. If I still don't brake it will do the job for me. That is fine if you have fallen asleep at the wheel and approaching a line of stationary traffic, but really annoying when you weaving your way in and out of parked cars in a housing estate. Needless to say, the first thing I do when getting in the car is to switch that feature off. I even have an ongoing argument with BMW that their "Intelligent Safety System" should default to "off", rather than "on" and the driver could switch it on if they wish to be annoyed that day. Or at least they should allow the driver to select the default setting. I keep telling them that their system is neither intelligent or safe (the other part of the feature is to take over the steering if you cross the line in the middle of the road without using the indicator, which is something I do often to avoid potholes and sunken drains and see no point in indicating if there are no other road users in the vicinity. It almost killed a cyclist once when I crossed the line to give him ample space and the "Intelligent Safety System" tugged the steering back towards the cyclist. Imaging explaining that to PC Plod if the car had knocked him off his bike :mad: :eek:
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
I too have recently been googling smart doorbell. Many of the features looked great, but I would like an additional feature - that when someone presses the button it closes an electrical circuit that rings a literal bell.

Yes, Ring doorbell does that. Its called the 'Chime' - basically just a little plug-in ding dong device that you can have anywhere in the house - and can have more than one if needed.

I was a bit sceptical about Ring at first, but am a bit of a convert.
 
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