The New Wine Book Thread

'Puligny Montrachet' by Simon Loftus has recently been republished and it is available at quite cheaply - I picked up a copy on Amazon I think quite recently. Also another nod to Peter Stafford Bow. I am reading his latest book, 'Firing Blancs'. Good fun, and whilst clearly exaggerated they really quite accurately hit on the challenges faced by supermarket buyers.
 
Just got an email re the newest addition to the Classic Wine Library series, "The Wines of South Africa" by Jim Clarke.Seriously considering it but I know many here are very much on top of the SA wine scene and may be able to answer a few questions to help me decide.

I know nothing about Jim Clarke. Is he a good authority?
Will he be on top of the new wave and natural wine scene as well as the classics (and new classics)? I mean I bought Skelton's book on UK wines in the same series, and also the book on Austria. Neither covered any of the new producers (I'm told Austria has made additions for its second edn). I just want an author with his or her finger on the pulse.

I don't suppose anyone has bought and looked at this already, or has been given a Review Copy?

Thanks for any help you can give.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Just got an email re the newest addition to the Classic Wine Library series, "The Wines of South Africa" by Jim Clarke.Seriously considering it but I know many here are very much on top of the SA wine scene and may be able to answer a few questions to help me decide.

I know nothing about Jim Clarke. Is he a good authority?
Will he be on top of the new wave and natural wine scene as well as the classics (and new classics)? I mean I bought Skelton's book on UK wines in the same series, and also the book on Austria. Neither covered any of the new producers (I'm told Austria has made additions for its second edn). I just want an author with his or her finger on the pulse.

I don't suppose anyone has bought and looked at this already, or has been given a Review Copy?

Thanks for any help you can give.

David, I for one have never heard of him, in either a UK or South African context, which is strange. Perhaps he is US based? Maybe someone else will know more than me.
 
David, I for one have never heard of him, in either a UK or South African context, which is strange. Perhaps he is US based? Maybe someone else will know more than me.
I know him personally. He's based out of New York, and at least used to be the marketing manager for Wines of South Africa. His knowledge of wines has always come across as sound, and I imagine he would know South African wine pretty well (even though, strangely, we've never talked about SA wines on the occasions when we've met).
 
Help please...been trying to find one of the discount codes for the Infinite Ideas Wine Library. There’s a long running 40% off code but though I have used it I can’t find it on Winepages.

There are several codes on the web but I can’t get any of them to work.

Thanks, DC
 
Nothing to do with David's question, but I am about half way through Kermit Lynch's Adventures on the Wine Route. It's a brilliant book. Amazing to look back at how far we have progressed in 30 odd years.
Oddly, Kevin, I have been rereading it with a view to a contemplative article next week. It is such a good book, and in looking at a time before the kind of wine many people here will know, it puts today’s much maligned low-intervention wine production in context.
 
Ian d'Agata's new book The Grapes and Wines of Italy is an excellent reference book. Far more concise and user friendly than the exhaustive Native Grapes tome, it still contains vast amounts of easy to look up info, region by region. Excellent resource.
It's worth getting for the information in it, but shows the problems of self-published works. Poorly organized and laid-out, lots of incomplete or missing references in the index, cheap binding, etc. For more money than the two previous books published by University of California Press, you get a lot less. Pros like UC Press know what they're doing and their editors add a lot of value.
 
Ian d'Agata's new book The Grapes and Wines of Italy is an excellent reference book. Far more concise and user friendly than the exhaustive Native Grapes tome, it still contains vast amounts of easy to look up info, region by region. Excellent resource.
Agree - truly excellent.

But it's only easy to look up info by virtue of its index - I once spent a while trying to find Rossese Bianco because I thought it would be in the "little known" section, while actually it is a "major variety". I am pretty sure that at the time there was only one varietal Rossese Bianco in commercial production.

Edit: Oops - prompted by @Geoff Kuehne's recent question, I now realise I was here writing about the much older "Native Wine Grapes of Italy". I haven't read any of his other books, so can't comment on them. @Adam Ventress, please feel free to unlike!
 
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It's worth getting for the information in it, but shows the problems of self-published works. Poorly organized and laid-out, lots of incomplete or missing references in the index, cheap binding, etc. For more money than the two previous books published by University of California Press, you get a lot less. Pros like UC Press know what they're doing and their editors add a lot of value.
Actually, the more I have looked into the detail, the more little anomalies I have noticed. the Tuscany region is very thorough, clearly separating Chianti Classico, Montalcino etc and recommending producers from each. In contrast, the Sicily content seems a bit rushed and Etna is really quite glossed over, considering how significant a region it has become. Although right to point out that many have jumped on the Etna bandwagon whose wines are not yet up to scratch, he makes the bizarre statement that "outside the top 25 producers, quality plummets" (and then goes on to only recommend 18) Even if such a specific number as 25 was completely accurate at the time of writing, surely it will be an out of date remark in no time. But, minor quibbles aside, it's still another thorough and valuable piece of work from a man who has done a lot for the profile of and education in Italian wine,
 
Could anyone point me to the right books to buy for my father in law for Christmas? He's planning a retirement trip all around Spain and Portugal - has quite a well developed palate that has historically gone to Loire and Rhone for "bigger" reds. Loves a bargain and a big fan of french co-op type setups.

He's completely green to Spain and Portugal, and would like to do some "research" type reading to understand the regions better, give him an idea of what to expect in different places (maybe to help decide where exactly to go), and then maybe some specific recommendations of producers to visit that are in line with his enjoyment of value and bigger reds.

TIA
 
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