The perfect Negroni

This thread having stimulated me I am now enjoying a Cardinale made with equal parts Plymouth navy strength, Noilly Prat and Carpano botanic bitters. It's really good, delicately aromatic and not very sweet at all. The Boulevardier, made with Bourbon instead of gin, is also excellent.
In the end though it seems to me that the most civilised and urbane of these drinks remains the original Americano, at least on those occasions when one doesn't require an alcoholic biff.
 
In the end though it seems to me that the most civilised and urbane of these drinks remains the original Americano, at least on those occasions when one doesn't require an alcoholic biff.
I'm looking forward to more than my fair share of Americanos later this month when we visit our son in Milan where he is at university. The Milanese do l'ora del aperitivo truly well. MAG bar, and the bar around the corner from Il Solferino here we come...
 
Obvs personal but, chez CB, a pre dinner negroni has the tiniest overpour of blood orange juice (in season freshly squeezed great, but if not Waitrose) ideally with a slice of dried blood orange. Just find it takes the spirit heat out of it.... Fully agree on the chilled ingredients / large ice-cube!
 
Last edited:
Obvs personal but, chez CB, a pre dinner negroni, has the tiniest overpour of blood orange juice (in season freshly squeezed great, but if not Waitrose) ideally with a slice of dried blood orange. Just find it takes the spirit heat out of it.... Fully agree on the chilled ingredients / large ice-cube!
Blood oranges are very seasonal over here but should appear in December for a month or so. I look forward to trying this.
 
Not the same, but having just taken a small pour of each in glasses with ice and soda the difference is not huge. The Martini is more aromatic, more bitter, slightly less sweet and a bit more alcoholic. It's to my taste a notably better drink.
In any event, Campari is no longer sold at retail in France, so Martini it is from now on.
 
Not really on point, but I don't know whether anyone here has seen the Campari family tomb in the Cimitero Monumentale in Milan (though Filippo knows of it I'm sure).

It's... quite something. The figures 'enjoying' the Last Supper are life size. Not sure whether Negronis were served.

Italy-Milan-Monumental-Cemetery-Last-Supper.jpg
 
There are a plethora of Vermouth and bitters in Italy to chose from for a perfect Negroni. Premiumization is very much alive and present into this market. Because Italy is a world leader in the field and thanks to lockdown I went at great lenghts in exploring the right combination/brand (for my own taste) for a Negroni.

I would suggest to start with whatever is from Del Professore aka Antica Distilleria Quaglia. They are classic and very refined (clearly a notch above Antica Formula which was the first widely spread premium vermouth). Another go-to for me are the liquors from Vecchio Magazzino Doganale. They are more rustic and they are from Calabria.

Another Vermouth in the Torino style but not so sweet or with less vanilla is Mulassano. It normally makes sense to pair bitter and vermouth from the same brand. Another delightful couple is from Val d'Aosta (clearly more herbal): La Valdotaine.

There are many others but this is a good start.

(I tend to use light to neutral gin in the vein of infused vodkas such as No 10. However No.3 is hard to beat. A mixing glass and a julep strainer, large ice cubes, along with orange in some form are all essentials)
 
Possibly because they are designed to be drunk in their own right rather than mixed? I may be wrong but I don't think Negronis and Americanos have any Spanish equivalent and nor do they seem popular.
 
I appreciate that this is somewhere between cheating and heresy in such august company, but I have really enjoyed this coffee-infused Negroni from Myatts Fields Cocktails (somewhere sarf of the river I believe). Would be a complete arse to get right making it from scratch (though no doubt an enjoyable process).

PXL_20221005_180555748.jpg
 
Top