NWR The "What are we listening to?" Thread

With all the recent press stuff commemorating the 50 years since Carole King’s Tapestry I am giving it a whirl, having not really played it in complete format since my youth club vinyl days.
Mmm....
Lovely album and reminds me of innocent times.
But she really is not much of a singer, “Beautiful” is a particularly poor vocal.
Not as bad as Sandie Shaw mind who keeps popping up on Tony Blackburn’s shows.

Other great albums which are 50 this year include

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Slight thread drift, but checking the team is aware of the Song Exploder podcast, where a musician takes apart the process by which a song came about. Variable, inevitably, and many of the acts are obscure (to fogey old me), but worth checking out. An example here: Episode 200: Yusuf / Cat Stevens

Thanks so much for this Alistair. Loads of interesting-looking stuff in there. I've just started the DJ Shadow episode.
 
The eight-track was invented by Bill Lear as a convenient music music source for his jets, this doesn't however absolve him of naming his daughter Shanda.
Well, that has completed a loop that I had thought may never be closed.
In 1973/4 my older cousins visiting from the USA brought me a gift of an 8 track player for the car and some cartridges.
I thought it was just a trendy/dodgy piece of branding that It was a "Lear Jet" player.
 
Well, I have at some point owned 24 of those, but Ram was not by Linda McCartney as far as I knew it was by her slightly famous husband, or was it both?
Too many guilty secrets in that list. Uriah Heep....blimey.
Notable how Marvin Gaye and Sly Stone (and George Harrison) stand out as so politically engaged vs quite a bit of bombast.
 
Well, I have at some point owned 24 of those, but Ram was not by Linda McCartney as far as I knew it was by her slightly famous husband, or was it both?

I lifted it off a FB group I belong to. One thing that amazes me on the FB page is how obsessed some of the members are with Aqualung. It was great when it came out but listening to it 50 years later i discovered just how much I had moved on from prog rock. Same with Yes, I can only take 5 mins at the most.
 
I lifted it off a FB group I belong to. One thing that amazes me on the FB page is how obsessed some of the members are with Aqualung. It was great when it came out but listening to it 50 years later i discovered just how much I had moved on from prog rock. Same with Yes, I can only take 5 mins at the most.
I didn't like most prog rock when it was popular and still don't but have a soft spot for In The Court Of The Crimson King and The Yes Album.
 
I owned/own 18 of those in various versions and formats over the years, but despite being om heavy rotation on classical music for decades, still listen to Yes, Jethro Tull, Crimson and Hendrix regularly. Close to the Edge and Thick as a Brick being particular favorites. Hendrix perhaps hasn't aged too well but some tracks are still amazing; and Crimson is all over the place and difficult to summarize.

I have recently been listening quite a lot to Talk Talk and Lana del Rey, as well as playing my Kate Bush albums (I tend increasingly to regard Aerial as her best album, it certainly is the best produced).

As for classical the list is too long to mention, lots of Faure recently (Eric Heidsiecks Nocturnes - fittingly for a wine forum) as well as Faures brilliant chamber music more or less complete.
 
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I lifted it off a FB group I belong to. One thing that amazes me on the FB page is how obsessed some of the members are with Aqualung. It was great when it came out but listening to it 50 years later i discovered just how much I had moved on from prog rock. Same with Yes, I can only take 5 mins at the most.
Mark,
I am to a degree with you that prog rock has not worn too well.
There are times though when I still love to sail “Close to the edge”:)
 
Well, that has completed a loop that I had thought may never be closed.
In 1973/4 my older cousins visiting from the USA brought me a gift of an 8 track player for the car and some cartridges.
I thought it was just a trendy/dodgy piece of branding that It was a "Lear Jet" player.
My dad got an 8-track in a new car around this time. As kids there was only one cartridge we could even bear to have on, Carpenters, that brown hits album. At a time before the Walkman driving from Leicester to Cornwall could be painful.
 
5 minutes seems a lot.......
I fully see your point Nigel, but as a musician I’m sure you have strong nostalgic feelings for the music you first discovered as a teenager. When death approaches you get more and more nostalgic for those halcyon days of youth when life was beginning to open up and reveal its pleasures to whatever soundtrack was around at the time.

I have to say that where I grew up the attractive and intelligent ladies of Leicestershire were very much into Genesis, Yes and such like (though maybe they didn’t always get Crimson and Sabbath).

However, I now have, I admit, a much better appreciation of Marvin Gaye, Barry White, Gloria Gaynor and Hot Chocolate than i did back then. And I always liked Bowie.
 
I owned/own 18 of those in various versions and formats over the years, but despite being om heavy rotation on classical music for decades, still listen to Yes, Jethro Tull, Crimson and Hendrix regularly. Close to the Edge and Thick as a Brick being particular favorites. Hendrix perhaps hasn't aged too well but some tracks are still amazing; and Crimson is all over the place and difficult to summarize.

I have recently been listening quite a lot to Talk Talk and Lana del Rey, as well as playing my Kate Bush albums (I tend increasingly to regard Aerial as her best album, it certainly is the best produced).

As for classical the list is too long to mention, lots of Faure recently (Eric Heidsiecks Nocturnes - fittingly for a wine forum) as well as Faures brilliant chamber music more or less complete.
The finest thing Steven Isserlis has ever done, in my opinion, is his Fauré album with Pascal Devoyon.
 
I owned/own 18 of those in various versions and formats over the years, but despite being om heavy rotation on classical music for decades, still listen to Yes, Jethro Tull, Crimson and Hendrix regularly. Close to the Edge and Thick as a Brick being particular favorites. Hendrix perhaps hasn't aged too well but some tracks are still amazing; and Crimson is all over the place and difficult to summarize.

I have recently been listening quite a lot to Talk Talk and Lana del Rey, as well as playing my Kate Bush albums (I tend increasingly to regard Aerial as her best album, it certainly is the best produced).

Lana Del Ray's Norman Fucking Rockwell is my favourite LP of the last five years. She has a new release next month.
Three new arrivals this week: Sleaford Mods Spare Ribs, Fontaines D.C, A Hero's Death & Fiona Apple Fetch the Bolt Cutters.
 
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