Unrequited Love

I have tried time and again to get to grips with this wine: older and younger vintages, bottles and magnums, with and without food. But we never quite seem to make the connection I’m looking for which is a shame as on paper she ticks all the boxes. But always there is a certain monolithic, ungiving froideur.

Mas de Daumas Gassac (rouge)

Do you have an unrequited love?
 
This feels like a group therapy session. I have to admit - in spite of having spent money and time - yet to have Barolo I really get - which is odd as I've had wonderful experiences with Barbaresco, somewhat consistently.

Anyway - excellent topic...
 
Hmmm good thread. I'd say: -
Aussie Shiraz. I can appreciate them but not enjoy them.
Salon. Again I appreciate it but again I've found no enjoyment whatsoever from the half dozen vintages I've been lucky to try after friends brought them to dinner/lunch.
Straight Cab Sav or Merlot wines. I just think it needs something else in the blend.
Tokaj. Never go the fuss. But then I have an aversion to sweet things, especially if they don't have good acidity.
d'Yquem. Possibly controversial. But I just don't seen what makes it special compared to say Coutet or even Rieussec.
On some of the above I'm glad I don't like them as they are wallet punching wines for other I wish I could find a good one and that is generally not for want of trying.
 
As a generalisation are we harder on regions with more variation? Champagne, as an example, three years of failure at me (often L Roederer) with only intermittent highs. Then Mr Pritchard came along and the region is one of my go to’s. Burgundy was miserable but Mr Blach said ‘leave it longer’ and now a wine that tastes of sauerkraut is heaven. I’ve (really) have only had Barolo from the 60s and 70s and I’ve loved them.

Ten years ago there would have been a queue of forumites lining up to say Bordeaux or Burgundy.
 
As a generalisation are we harder on regions with more variation? Champagne, as an example, three years of failure at me (often L Roederer) with only intermittent highs. Then Mr Pritchard came along and the region is one of my go to’s. Burgundy was miserable but Mr Blach said ‘leave it longer’ and now a wine that tastes of sauerkraut is heaven. I’ve (really) have only had Barolo from the 60s and 70s and I’ve loved them.

Ten years ago there would have been a queue of forumites lining up to say Bordeaux or Burgundy.
Did Mr Blach specifically suggest waiting longer so those most-loved sauerkraut notes would emerge?! :eek:
 
Champagne. Cant stand the stuff.
This is one where I've definitely managed to convert myself. Much as I tried desperately (and ultimately successfully) to like olives and mushrooms after leaving University.

I *feel* as though I am on this journey with riesling. I *have* had wonderful experiences with dry (as in actually dry, rather than "just try this" dry) riesling, but not managed to really get beyond that...yet.
 
The two that would stick out for me are champagnes, and I think maybe I have just had them too young:

DP - maybe I just don't get it but I have not enjoyed 02/04/06 - although all tried young. To me these seemed straight forward, boring and lcking in complexity. Po-Yu very kindly shared a ‘95 Oenetheque which was very good indeed but I just cant get on with the regular/P1

Comtes - again maybe because I have not had a mature example. I had a good to very good bottle of 06 that I had took along to the Glasshouse last year (a M&S special) but a bottle this year seemed awkward and a bit coarse. A few years ago, on separate occasions, both 06 and 04/02 (cant remember which, was at a 02vs04 Fizz n Fish event At Masters) showed a rather offputting smelly socks/burning rubber note.

In both cases I think it is that I don’t really care for reductive styles or reduction that much...
 
The two that would stick out for me are champagnes, and I think maybe I have just had them too young:

DP - maybe I just don't get it but I have not enjoyed 02/04/06 - although all tried young. To me these seemed straight forward, boring and lcking in complexity. Po-Yu very kindly shared a ‘95 Oenetheque which was very good indeed but I just cant get on with the regular/P1

Comtes - again maybe because I have not had a mature example. I had a good to very good bottle of 06 that I had took along to the Glasshouse last year (a M&S special) but a bottle this year seemed awkward and a bit coarse. A few years ago, on separate occasions, both 06 and 04/02 (cant remember which, was at a 02vs04 Fizz n Fish event At Masters) showed a rather offputting smelly socks/burning rubber note.

In both cases I think it is that I don’t really care for reductive styles or reduction that much...
Funnily enough the 06 Comtes I’ve found the same. First one was lively and lovely but even that one you brought to the glasshouse I liked but thought it a little brutish and awkward. It was that bottle that convinced me to leave them.
I had the 04 last night and it was a stunner but it could be like you say, one of those you just can’t enjoy. Have to say I’m there with a lot of Italian wines which I know you love ! The young ones in particular I can’t touch most of the time.
 
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Barolo, Condrieu, CNdP, most Spanish/Rhone whites, Barossa reds. Still on the fence with regard to Mas de Daumas. Recent bottles have been rather too bretty for me. This will be probably be controversial round these parts, but... Musar.
 
Wines that I've really wanted to love, but can't quite get to love me back: Cornas, Barolo, Riesling Trocken (after the first glass). Most other things have at least given me a sly wink and a hint of a promise...
 
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