VI-1 to be scrapped?

I think it is the lifting of the bureaucratic load that is being celebrated. Daniel Lambert, who has occasionally contributed here, is the author of this liberation.
 
'I think it is the lifting of the bureaucratic load that is being celebrated. Daniel Lambert, who has occasionally contributed here, is the author of this liberation.'

Not true really - there were a great many people involved. Daniel made a lot of noise on social media, and got a lot of press coverage and heaped significant pressure and made sure that the trade was united in tackling this by raising awareness. The minister in charge is my local MP and also my MD's MP. We arranged a meeting with her to discuss concerns and pointed out that she has said the trade was behind these forms - which they were not - and that she had refused to meet the WSTA - our trade body. Neither Daniel, his MP or anyone else managed to get a meeting with her - our sole aim was to get a meeting between the WSTA's Miles Beale and Defra and the minister Victoria Prentis. We achieved that which led directly to this news. David Gleave of Liberty Wines brought together the heads of all the UK's largest wine importers to write a letter to Defra, applying joined up pressure on the govt to put this in place.

But the real hard work was done by Miles at WSTA - who did all the formal representation, managed the overall approach - he briefed us twice prior to our meeting, and met regularly, coordinated the attack and so on. He is who should most receive any congratulations.

This big thing with this is that a form is required for every shipment coming into the EU. When we left it became required into the UK. The spectre on the horizon was of a form for every shipment, and a quality analysis of every wine on every shipment coming not only from outside the EU as is current but inside. That would prevent many European producers from bothering with the UK, it would make parcels of more niche wines impossible to import. That is now off the table. At the same time it removed from other countries the need for this. In countries like New Zealand I believe that the govt take care of the forms and costs as part of industry body membership. The cost savings won't be over here I don't think - it will be to wine producers, and will allow a broader spectrum of wines to be imported into the UK. That is the big win rather than the cost saving per bottle to consumer which at best is negligible and at worst makes no impact.
 
This is great news. I've seen horrific factual misrepresentation of what this is all about in some of the UK press online, and we won't go there...but it does mean, as Tim states clearly, that the result for UK consumers will not so much be a potential tiny decrease in price per bottle, but in our chances of getting hold of some of the artisan and niche wines which the visitors to this forum habitually drink. It will also make life a lot more easy and hopefully thrilling for the hundreds of smaller UK importers who make a living selling such wines. Well done to Daniel, Tim, Miles and everyone else who made this happen.
 
Blimey Alex. I watch for your posts with slight trepidation as I never understand your acronyms! AGW, MSM, VI-1... WTF!
You got me there, because I don't even know exactly what it stands for, but I should have included a link to explain....

 
This is brilliant news for Jardin Oculto. Bolivia doesn't have a lab that is accredited to carry out the analysis required for a VI-1. It can be done through another country (Chile or Argentina), but this would have incurred an additional cost.

I have this mental image of a bunch of scientists getting pissed in a laboratory, testing each bottle carefully and saying “yep, that’s wine. Next!”.
 
So de we think that this will mean some of the smaller producers in the EU that have stopped shipping to the UK will start again? I can see it will help those that sell to the UK trade but what about those that sell direct to consumers? I know of at least one Italian producer that stopped selling direct to UK consumers.
 
So de we think that this will mean some of the smaller producers in the EU that have stopped shipping to the UK will start again? I can see it will help those that sell to the UK trade but what about those that sell direct to consumers? I know of at least one Italian producer that stopped selling direct to UK consumers.
No. The VI-1 is not the barrier to direct sales to consumers.
 
So de we think that this will mean some of the smaller producers in the EU that have stopped shipping to the UK will start again? I can see it will help those that sell to the UK trade but what about those that sell direct to consumers? I know of at least one Italian producer that stopped selling direct to UK consumers.
You make a good point, Andrew. Jura and Burgenland are the Euro-regions where I know more people on a personal level than any other and I also have close connections in Alsace (I know someone who helps run one of the smaller-producer grower groups). In those parts of France there's evidence a good number of growers have become a bit anti-English, a sort of Brexit backlash on a minor level coupled with an attitude that we are a hassle and they can sell their wine elsewhere. Luckily a lot of the UK importers, especially the smaller ones who know the value of really working hard for their clients, have a close enough relationship to weather this. It's not just me. I've talked about this with other writers and journalists in the UK.

So far I've not experienced any of this from Austria, other than with one Burgenland family who sadly told me they won't bother anymore (but they have a frankly crap UK importer), but it's a fact that new markets have opened up. You recall how once the Chinese took off some Aussie producers pulled out of the UK? Well, now China has slapped a 200+% tax on Aussie wine some are trying to come back, dipping their toe in the water here. As an aside did you know Penfold's Rawson's Retreat now contains South African wine for the Chinese market?. But Japan has kind of fallen in love with Austrian wine and who knows what will happen there.

Selling to consumers was always going to be difficult post-brexit. We tried to order some top notch vinegar from France about a week or so ago, direct from a specialist shop, but they wouldn't ship to UK now. Thankfully someone is over visiting family in France and hopefully a case is being delivered to them tomorrow, to bring back. I wonder whether anyone is having more difficulty arranging visits with the small artisans?
 
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