TN Wolf Blass 1974 Shiraz/Cab Sauvignon...Ancient and Modern

My Australian wife's birthday so, after a few slugs of Tatty rose, opened this piece of history. I had a half glass last night via coravin which was quite restrained, if anything I would have said oldish pinot. However after wriggling out quite a wet cork and decanting, mainly to remove cork bits, we had this with a chunk of rib eye this evening.
First, still a deep red, little if any bricking. Rich nose with a mushroom touch, a tad funky, still dark fruit. Had thinned out a little on the palate to start with but, about an hour in, the shiraz elements really came through. Medium body, not massively complex but plenty still going on, still a nice very drinkable glass of wine, not just an academic exercise.
80% shiraz from Barossa and Langhorne, 20% cab from McLaren vale, made the same year as20191203_212250.jpg 20191203_212250.jpg 20191129_124307.jpg 20191203_212239.jpg Wolf Blass' first major trophy.
 
The capsule against that background is enough of an optical illusion whereby I initially thought you'd taken some port tongs to it! Sounds like a fun bottle, how very interesting to try.
 
Quite a throwback.
Australia only just moved over to the metric system in 1974, and it clearly took some time for glass moulds and things to be updated: the old 1 pint 6fl oz bottles translated into an awkward 738ml in the new labelling sizes.
Interesting that it was so drinkable; 1974 was pretty widely regarded as one of the worst years in SA (rain) until 1989 came along.
Graeme
 
Thanks for the notes and pictures Alistair, much appreciated. I have always liked their old labels, a bit flamboyant to be sure but striking and informative. I shall have to replicate your gesture by opening a bottle of 1983 Wolf Blass Yellow Label for my Australian wife on her birthday.
Interesting that it was so drinkable; 1974 was pretty widely regarded as one of the worst years in SA (rain) until 1989 came along.
Wolf Blass won the 1975 Jimmy Watson Trophy with their 1974 Black Label so they certainly found good fruit. My guess is that Langhorne Creek fruit had something to do with it as I recall Wolf Blass paying homage to the region.
 
Yes, Mahmoud; for all the reputation of the 'prestige' SA regions (not that anything in Oz was particularly prestige back then) it was Langhorne Creek that built WBs reputation, and probably a few others too.
 
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