NWR Women's tennis

I’m always réticent to comment on things like sexism or racism when I’m not in that person’s shoes, because it’s so difficult when you can’t see their perspective.

However, I think Tom C did sum it up. You want to feel that Williams was hard done by, but the evidence makes it very hard to do so. Greatness doesn’t make a nice person, as Wagner proved.
 
Hope it's OK to resurrect this, but it seems strange to me that there's no talk here on Raducanu's victory in the US Open.
I've seen that the BBC are asking people if they think this could be the greatest achievement in British sport in living memory.
It certainly seems a massive achievement by someone who happens to be British, and I can't think of anyone more deserving of such an accolade.
 
I've seen that the BBC are asking people if they think this could be the greatest achievement in British sport in living memory.
It's certainly that within the realm of tennis, but there are other contenders in sport in general I think. Winning the rugby world cup in 2003 for instance, was a display of the same kind of excellence. No doubt there are one or two other examples 'within living memory'.
 
It's certainly that within the realm of tennis, but there are other contenders in sport in general I think. Winning the rugby world cup in 2003 for instance, was a display of the same kind of excellence. No doubt there are one or two other examples 'within living memory'.
But I suppose the English team were pretty highly regarded at the time, so not so much of a shock value there, surely?
Obviously this does raise the issue of what constitutes a great achievement. Also, what constitutes British sport? Should it be a team that is nominally a British team, or can it apply to individuals who just happen to be British?
Or maybe it should be an achievement that most raises the national spirit (in which case, if England football had won Euros that would have been in with a shout)?

Here's the shortlist as proposed by the BBC (typically BBC!):

1. England's football World Cup win
2. Murray's Wimbledon win
3. Super Saturday at London 2012
4. GB women's hockey gold
5. Wilkinson's World Cup-winning drop goal
6. England's 2005 Ashes win
7. Leicester City's Premier League triumph
8. England win netball gold
9. Asher-Smith becomes world champion
10. Raducanu's fairytale of New York
 
I don't follow much sport - in fact almost none at all - but the story of Raducanu is just irresistibly good. She was doing her A-levels a few months ago! She has such obvious charm alongside the talent. And the ability to perform at that level under that kind of pressure with such grace... it's unbelievably impressive. What a nice, heartwarming thing it all is.
 
On the cricket side, how does 2005 compare to 1981? Maybe one could even single out individual performances in those.

Might also be interesting to open this up to greatest achievement regardless of nationality.

I suppose we should not be looking at a "lifetime achievement type thing" more of a single moment. Another angle would be memorability.
 
Pinsett and Redgrave winning four consecutive Olympic gold medals in rowing is also up there. And what about Stokes batting to 135 unbeaten to win the test at Headingly. Come to think of it, there are a good number of great performances both individual and at team level, and despite the miserable performance of our football team, the country has been able to bask in the glory of a great number of outstanding sporting achievements 'within living memory' to use Alex's definition. I would take nothing away from Radicanu's wonderful win, but there is definitely a bit of hyperbole in the media.
 
Pinsett and Redgrave winning four consecutive Olympic gold medals in rowing is also up there. And what about Stokes batting to 135 unbeaten to win the test at Headingly. Come to think of it, there are a good number of great performances both individual and at team level, and despite the miserable performance of our football team, the country has been able to bask in the glory of a great number of outstanding sporting achievements 'within living memory' to use Alex's definition. I would take nothing away from Radicanu's wonderful win, but there is definitely a bit of hyperbole in the media.
Spoken like a true tennis legend Mr. Rafa Zambuni :)

You have to really admire the nature of the win - I found it all rather uplifting to see a fierce competitive spirit matched with balance and such easy charm off the court. Her tennis style is really fun to watch too.
 
I think Raducanu’s New York fairytale beats all of these by a country mile. Just the achievement alone. Then you layer on top of that the symbolism of her multiculturalism, born in Canada to Romanian and Chinese parents, and an immigrant to Britain at the age of two. The example to other young athletes from diverse backgrounds, a symbol of what London and Britain really is - the message of unbridled joy, sunny optimism and hope - [post edited, continued in politics section]
 
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Whilst the press has got ahead of itself a little on ER it’s no surprise really! Her playing style and effortless charm are so impressive. The press always go nuts about strong new players as we’re generally so crap at tennis - weather and lack of courts compared with say France playing major parts.

But ER has lifted the nation after some pretty miserable times and for that alone I’d say she deserves all that’s coming to her soon!!
I’m no expert but I thought it was a fantastic match. Both players are incredible athletes who move brilliantly, hit hard and construct intelligent points. I hope they’re both around for a long time to come - and also that maybe someone might advise Fetnandez’s family to behave with a little more class court side!
 
I think , as an individual sporting achievement it is right up there.Perhaps it is unfair to compare individual and team sports. She played 10 matches without losing a set. No-one has ever come through qualifying to win a GS.

If England had won the world cup in 2003 with a team who were all under 20 and none of whom had played in world cup before or bradley wiggins had won at the same age having never competed in TdF before then comparisons would be fair.

She also had to cope with the fact that she had to withdraw from Wimbledon after what was clearly a panic attack

well done! Hopefully its just the beginning for her
 
It was fascinating that neither of the finalists were particularly tall or muscly. One would assume that the likes of Sakkari and Sabalenka would have an advantage there, but Emma and Lylah perhaps had the benefit of a youthful enthusiasm. I really hope they can both hold onto that. Watching the way that Emma's opponents essentially gave up quite early on - couldn't take pressure on the second serve, etc, was fascinating. Lylah seemed to win by never accepting that she was beaten until the final whistle (so to speak). Great role models, both (families notwithstanding!) and I hope we can see a long term rivalry a bit like Evert/Navratilova.
 
Hope it's OK to resurrect this, but it seems strange to me that there's no talk here on Raducanu's victory in the US Open.
Personally, I find it difficult to find anything to say that hasn't already been said ad nauseam by the media. I note that the stream of repetitive verbiage is still going on, and will doubtless continue at least until she has returned to Blighty to give interviews.

I agree wholeheartedly with everything that they have been saying, but quite frankly have little to add.
 
I think a Celtic supporter would say that their winning the European Cup in 1967 should also be on that list.
Indeed, if not at the top, given that it was achieved by a squad of players who were all born within 30 miles of Celtic Park. Something that I can safely predict will never be achieved again (obviously meaning that the winning squad are all born within 30 miles of their team's stadium ;) ).
Can't believe the BBC missed off Bradley Wiggins and his winning the Tour de France in 2012. I believe he was the first Briton to do that as well...
Not so sure about that one as Froome was following team orders and could have won the tour himself that year. In the cycling world I'd go for Graeme Obree's achievements in taking the hour record twice (the first time only several hours after his initial, failed, attempt, as he had booked the track for 24 hours). Each time he was still an amateur cyclist. He also won the world pursuit championship twice (once as an amateur and once after turning pro). And just about everything he did was met with official opposition.

However, Emma Raducanu's achievement is quite amazing, especially as she came through 3 qualifying rounds before even reaching the tournament proper. Then, to win every match without dropping a set is a huge achievement itself. And it was all done playing a style of tennis, with power, speed and mobility that is a breath of fresh air after Serena Williams domination with powerhouse tennis. I watch the final on Saturday night and there was some excellent rallies, which made the match so much more interesting and exciting (and no loud grunting either).
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Yes, the omission of Celtic's victory in '67 does show enormous bias by whoever compiled the list for the BBC. To put Leicester City winning the premier league in, but omit the first british club to win the European Cup, beating Inter Milan in the final, with, as Paul says, a team entirely composed of players born within 30 miles of Celtic Park is inexplicable otherwise. That should be at #1 position in that table. The fact that they were beaten in extra time in the final three years later only compounds that (my dad and I were among the 138,000 who watched them beat Billy Bremner's Leeds at Hampden Park in the semi-final).
 
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Amazing win. Great to see and very savvy of C4 for picking up the TV rights. I think for sporting endeavours in my lifetime the only other one that comes close is Leicester winning the premier league. Most of the others mentioned were won by world class athletes at the top of their game (in some cases for a long time). The joy of this alongside the Leicester win was its sheer unexpected quality. Where a genuine underdog, or complete non contender, rises to a challenge seemingly far beyond them.

You can understand the media’s reaction as I guess we could very much do with some good news stories for a change.

One thing I hope though is that she at least goes on to win one other grand slam (and hopefully more) as it would be a hard slog knowing that your best tennis was at the very start of your career. She seems more than capable.
 
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