NWR Women's tennis

That's right, Colin - Jackie Pallow too, and Kent Walton. And Tibor Szakacs with his karate chop.

Then there were the little old ladies in ringside seats jumping up to handbag the baddies. In retrospect that was probably scripted too.

We probably take sport too seriously these days, but there must be a happy medium between professional wrestling and the current multimillion pound industries. Does that help bring the thread back on topic?
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Les Kellet was remarkable for being so unremarkable - as plain as a pikestaff and not a costume or gimmick that I can recall. I think at the time I maybe believed he was playing it for real against all his more comedy-oriented brethren.
 
How could I have forgotten about Les Kellett?!

There were some who really did appear to be doing it properly and seriously - wasn't there a lightweight guy called George Kidd or something who was supposedly World Champion for many years?
 
Not exactly women's tennis but has anyone else noted the achievements of Londoner Joe Salisbury? Won both men's and mixed doubles at the US Open to add to his mixed win at the French Open this year. So that's a Brit winning three grand slams in a year and barely a footnote in UK media as far as I've noticed.
One of the cadre of astonishing young tennis players at my club is his best mate. I ran into him outside the Wimbledon qualifiers and asked him how he was as I hadn’t seen him around the club for a while. He was very excited because Joe was playing in the final round of qualifying of men’s doubles and he was off to support him. That was about three years ago.

Not quite the meteoric rise of Radacanou but in tennis terms not far off it.
 
I know that it's romantic to posit that Emma Raducanu 'came out of nowhere', but she has been playing tennis since she was five years old and spotted by the LTA aged 9 and put into their special program for youngsters of excellence. So that's nearly a decade of hard graft put in before turning up for the Wimbledon qualifiers this year. The idea that that kind of prowess appears out of nowhere just doesn't fly.

Oh, I thought she just rocked up to New York and said "what do I do with this funny bat thing", ruined the whole thing for me! ;)
 
Eddie is a lovely bloke, not a bad recreational skier. But in tennis terms he would not have made it past the first qualifying round.
His world ranking was 55 in the year before the Olympics. So several hacks better than recreational, and would stand a fair chance of qualifying in the US Open, but probably not getting much further.

Emma OTOH was ranked 345 at the start of this year. Still a perfectly competent player of course, but it is a measure of how she "came from nowhere" in winning tbe whole competition without dropping a set.
 
You surprise me. He used to ski at our local dry slope a his skiing was effective rather than with style.
Was that his ranking at the olympics or worldwide? I would suspect there were 55 better.ski jumpers in Helsinki or any other Nordic capital than Eddie.
 
Was that his ranking at the olympics or worldwide?
Worldwide. My source is his Wikipedia article, so it must be true ;) Sadly no source is quoted for the statistic. It also said he switched to jumping because he was not good enough at downhill to progress far, which maybe ties in with what you say?

Must admit though, that what you say about many ski-jumpers in Nordic countries probably being better sounds right to me.

Just checked, and the 55 ranking is also mentioned a few other places, including the TeamGB website
 
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Wonder if the 55 is an artifact of how the ranking is calculated.

For example if there are a few international events with 50 or 60 competitors, the UK is allowed to send one competitor to each one, Eddie comes last in every one, and he doesn't take part in other less-prestigious competitions
 
Raducanu was/is superb. But no more so IMHO than Rachael Blackmore. Six Cheltenham Festival winners, including the Champion Hurdle, gave her the Festival jockeys' championship in March. She followed this astonishing achievement a month later by winning the Grand National.

Lest anyone might think that she had the best horses to ride in those races, no-one who knows racing would think that. Her talent in reading a race tactically, and in creating an empathetic partnership with each of so many different horses, marks her out as a uniquely talented jockey in today's jump racing. She suffered some nasty injuries in a fall in July, but expects to be back riding well before the end of the year.

She is tough of course (taking two horrid falls in other races at the same Cheltenham Festival), but also graceful, unassuming, approachable and friendly. Just as much a star of her sport as Emma Raducanu is of tennis.
 

Tom Cannavan

Administrator
Raducanu was/is superb. But no more so IMHO than Rachael Blackmore. Six Cheltenham Festival winners, including the Champion Hurdle, gave her the Festival jockeys' championship in March. She followed this astonishing achievement a month later by winning the Grand National.

Lest anyone might think that she had the best horses to ride in those races, no-one who knows racing would think that. Her talent in reading a race tactically, and in creating an empathetic partnership with each of so many different horses, marks her out as a uniquely talented jockey in today's jump racing. She suffered some nasty injuries in a fall in July, but expects to be back riding well before the end of the year.

She is tough of course (taking two horrid falls in other races at the same Cheltenham Festival), but also graceful, unassuming, approachable and friendly. Just as much a star of her sport as Emma Raducanu is of tennis.

But Mark, Mark, Mark: she had a horse to help her ;)
 
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