Diam vs Screwcap

I wrote recently of my enjoyment of Selvapiana's Chianti Rufina 2017. A reorder of this wine, this time from TWS, came under screwcap, giving a rare chance to compare the two closures. It remains recognisably the same wine under screwcap but the difference is remarkable, there seems so much more amplitude and aromatic distinction from the version under Diam, though of course there could be a thousand other things that make the difference and for all I know the bottlings could have been months apart. The screwcap version shows no reduction whatever but neither does it show any positive development. It would be interesting to see how things are in five years time but at the moment the Diam provides a much more enjoyable drink.
 
Very interesting. The current stock at TWS is showing as under 'natural cork', but the first web search hit was a '15 under screwcap. I would be surprised if TWS requested that it be bottled under screwcap rather than diam. Is this stock originally intended for a different market? Was it Diam5 for the previous bottles? I wonder if the screwcap liner was of equivalent porosity.
 
I wrote recently of my enjoyment of Selvapiana's Chianti Rufina 2017. A reorder of this wine, this time from TWS, came under screwcap, giving a rare chance to compare the two closures. It remains recognisably the same wine under screwcap but the difference is remarkable, there seems so much more amplitude and aromatic distinction from the version under Diam, though of course there could be a thousand other things that make the difference and for all I know the bottlings could have been months apart. The screwcap version shows no reduction whatever but neither does it show any positive development. It would be interesting to see how things are in five years time but at the moment the Diam provides a much more enjoyable drink.
Heaven only knows what it might have been like under the mentioned "real/natural cork"
 
My order of preference: DIAM, then screw cap, then cork. But then, I'm really bothered when a bottle worth many thousands of dollars turns up corked, which has happened on many occasions where I have been present. But if you've got way more money than I do, it may not matter, except for those peskily rare bottles like 1945 Ch. Latour that are damned difficult to replace these days, no matter what the price.
 
I too have seen many bottles ruined by their closures, though old ones seem to fail far more often from a loose seal than by TCA. Nevertheless, 100% of the truly great wines I have tasted were sealed with cork. I think TCA rates only became intolerable in the 1990s.
I'm sorry to say I won't live long enough to see what happens to Diam and screwcap after 40 or 50 years.
 
I wrote recently of my enjoyment of Selvapiana's Chianti Rufina 2017. A reorder of this wine, this time from TWS, came under screwcap, giving a rare chance to compare the two closures. It remains recognisably the same wine under screwcap but the difference is remarkable, there seems so much more amplitude and aromatic distinction from the version under Diam, though of course there could be a thousand other things that make the difference and for all I know the bottlings could have been months apart. The screwcap version shows no reduction whatever but neither does it show any positive development. It would be interesting to see how things are in five years time but at the moment the Diam provides a much more enjoyable drink.
Screwcap doesn't show more reduction, on average, compared to other unless the winemaking isn't right for the closure.
 
I too have seen many bottles ruined by their closures, though old ones seem to fail far more often from a loose seal than by TCA. Nevertheless, 100% of the truly great wines I have tasted were sealed with cork. I think TCA rates only became intolerable in the 1990s.
I'm sorry to say I won't live long enough to see what happens to Diam and screwcap after 40 or 50 years.
Obviously! Screw Caps and DIAM are a relatively new phenomenon in most Europe wine regions.
 
Screw caps perform like the best corks.
That seems to be a statement that hasn't yet been proved by time, Johnny, and I wouldn't say it is illustrated by the bottle on which I posted, but there are so many variables that I can't take any kind of firm view. Sometimes I suspect that screwcaps may be altogether too good.
 
I too have seen many bottles ruined by their closures, though old ones seem to fail far more often from a loose seal than by TCA. Nevertheless, 100% of the truly great wines I have tasted were sealed with cork. I think TCA rates only became intolerable in the 1990s.
I'm sorry to say I won't live long enough to see what happens to Diam and screwcap after 40 or 50 years.
20 year anniversary of screwcaps in NZ this year Thom, so you only have to hang in there for another 20 odd years. If you ever come to NZ I have 2001 Neudorf Pinot under screwcap and cork. Also my own 2001 Riesling under screwcap and cork.
 
Thanks Kevin!
I'm guessing that they've made a lot of advances in 20 years.
I'm no expert on the technical side of it Thom. I think it is more a matter of making sure the winemaking and bottling process adapts to screwcaps. Also worth remembering, the Australians, although they officially started using screwcaps in 2000, actually had been trialing caps for many years prior to that. So there are some very old screwcapped wines out there.
 
20 year anniversary of screwcaps in NZ this year Thom, so you only have to hang in there for another 20 odd years. If you ever come to NZ I have 2001 Neudorf Pinot under screwcap and cork. Also my own 2001 Riesling under screwcap and cork.
All my NZ reds, from seven different wineries, from 2000 to 2012, are all under cork, so its all too late for me.
 
That seems to be a statement that hasn't yet been proved by time, Johnny, and I wouldn't say it is illustrated by the bottle on which I posted, but there are so many variables that I can't take any kind of firm view. Sometimes I suspect that screwcaps may be altogether too good.
Well it has. Look at the Hunter Valley semillon experiment.

There again, can anything ever be proven 100%?
 
Screwcap doesn't show more reduction, on average, compared to other unless the winemaking isn't right for the closure.

I'm no expert on the technical side of it Thom. I think it is more a matter of making sure the winemaking and bottling process adapts to screwcaps. Also worth remembering, the Australians, although they officially started using screwcaps in 2000, actually had been trialing caps for many years prior to that. So there are some very old screwcapped wines out there.
That's pretty much what I was trying to say above.
 
Look at the Hunter Valley semillon experiment.
Does that not simply demonstrate that good screwcaps are better than bad corks, particularly for Hunter Valley semillon? I suspect that as with everything wine related there is very little real proof of anything, which on balance is as it should be.
 
Does that not simply demonstrate that good screwcaps are better than bad corks, particularly for Hunter Valley semillon? I suspect that as with everything wine related there is very little real proof of anything, which on balance is as it should be.
One big difference that I think has been solidly demonstrated, Thom, is the uniformity from bottle to bottle with DIAM and screwcap and the lack of uniformity with a cork closure. I have friends in the trade who often open multiple bottles from the same case when they are having a trade tasting and they all tell me that the variation from bottle to bottle for wines under cork is immense (and keep in mind, these are young wines; the variation will only get greater as the wines age), but there is no such variation from one bottle to the next with DIAM and screw cap closures.

Also it's quite clear that cork imposes a taste (which some people like) that is not there for wines under screw cap.
 
Does that not simply demonstrate that good screwcaps are better than bad corks, particularly for Hunter Valley semillon? I suspect that as with everything wine related there is very little real proof of anything, which on balance is as it should be.
No. The clear conclusion was that screwcaps performed just like the very best corks.
 
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