How Old Fashioned is Fullers 1845?

Discussion in 'The Beer Forum' started by David Thomas, Aug 3, 2017.

  1. I'm really enjoying a fresh bottle of this, a classy beer. But how close is it to older English beers? I presume they've based it on a very old recipe. I've read that one of the malts used (amber malt) is rather old fashioned and tends not to be used any more...Anyway, I imagine this is not too far from how certain beers used to taste, but I've found little information about the history of the recipe...
     
  2. I wonder if amber malt is a Munich/Vienna of some type David, as I certainly picked up a charred/meat-stock-cubey note to the last one I had. It's also an "old ale" isn't it, so aged for a while before bottling and taking on a tangy sourness.

    None of the above answers your question(!), but I think I've read that before bottling / refrigeration, sour(er) beers were unavoidable and mixing in old ales with fresher brews might have resulted in something like 1845.

    Nice beer btw!
     
  3. As far as I know the only genuine old ale still brewed is the one that is used as a blend for Greene King Strong Suffolk. This is slowly matured in oak casks which gives it a distinctive winey, slightly sour character. There are a number of beers called old ales but I don't think any of them are aged like this. I don't think 1845 claims to be an old ale. Fullers say the beer is based on an old recipe but,with modern brewing methods, it is unlikely that any beer brewed now would taste exactly like a beer brewed in the 19th century.

    It is a very good beer though.
     
  4. Bottle says it's matured for 100 days Alan, but that doesn't of course make it an old ale! I certainly pick up a sour/winey note in 1845 (and I think in OP too, though there seems to be a lot of doubt as to exactly what OP is trying to be - other than its own style!).

    There are a number of beers which aim at the "old ale" style I think - Owd Roger, Old Tom, some of the Innis & Gunns? - but who knows whether they're old-style old ales. Not a style I'm a huge fan of (if it exists) but the 1845 very much is!
     

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