NWR TV Thread

I had no idea that this was a common trend and had rather unthinkingly assumed it was something the younger members of only my family had somehow settled on. Following a bit of googling after reading your post, the trend is fascinating! It seems somewhat related to the myriad, competing electronic distractions that exist now but that dod not when TV arrived and established itself in our lives.
Good to know, I can reassure my neighbour who's advancing years and hearing decline have met with stubborn refusal to consider any aid, that she is actually down with the kids:rolleyes:
 
Watched the first two episodes of The Gold yesterday and was enthralled really. It clearly owes an enormous debt to The Wire (aka The Greatest TV Show Ever) as an obsessively detailed follow-the-tentacles probe into organised crime, money laundering, corruption, the Docklands etc.

Grade A Acting, especially from the cops led by Hugh Bonneville, and production values: sumptuous 80s clobber, cars, hairdos, Embassy No 1 and darts in boozers.

The two main flaws are a little too much exposition eg the young woman estate agent explaining yuppiedom while brandishing an enormous champagne flute, and the central villain is played as some kind of Webster/Shakespeare antihero, a tasteless offence against the reality.
 
Grade A Acting, especially from the cops led by Hugh Bonneville,
I'm enjoying it too. Always pleasing to see H. Williams, as I knew him at school, bestriding the acting world like a colossus. He was a quiet and pleasant boy whose current well deserved eminence was not necessarily predictable at the time.
The series doesn't seem to be immune from the usual drink inaccuracies in period reconstructions.
 
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We have just started The Gold, very much enjoying and slightly puzzled by some reviews which indicated the plotting and story lines were too complex. For whom, one wonders.
Just rattled through two seasons of Hacks, some fun writing though a couple of the leads unconvincing and under or over cooked.
 
We have just started The Gold, very much enjoying and slightly puzzled by some reviews which indicated the plotting and story lines were too complex. For whom, one wonders.
Just rattled through two seasons of Hacks, some fun writing though a couple of the leads unconvincing and under or over cooked.
Alistair,
I found it all a bit of a muddle as per my earlier post.
Saying that we had been on a GnT taste off followed by a bottle of champagne, perhaps I shall have another look, ......though maybe not immediately after Simon's memorial get together.
 
Alistair,
I found it all a bit of a muddle as per my earlier post.
Saying that we had been on a GnT taste off followed by a bottle of champagne, perhaps I shall have another look, ......though maybe not immediately after Simon's memorial get together.
You are not alone, I saw some broadsheet reviews said was too muddled...we started with the first glass of the evening which may have helped. See you tomorrow!
 
I had no idea that this was a common trend and had rather unthinkingly assumed it was something the younger members of only my family had somehow settled on. Following a bit of googling after reading your post, the trend is fascinating! It seems somewhat related to the myriad, competing electronic distractions that exist now but that dod not when TV arrived and established itself in our lives.
Still intrigued by this I note there is a Guardian article on the subject:
https://www.theguardian.com/comment...-baffle-me-but-at-least-we-agree-on-subtitles

The article does not live up to the interesting- sounding title though and I now realise is not worth reading! Some of the comments are more illuminating.
 
As older members of the Forum may recall, I have no interest in TV fiction or indeed literature. So it’s, documentaries , news and sport on the Box of which there is more than enough to keep me interested.
One documentary I can recommend is The Street on Amazon Prime. A look at the working class community who live on Hoxton street,N1 and the effect on their lives of gentrification and austerity etc. Sponsored by the Arts Council .
 
As older members of the Forum may recall, I have no interest in TV fiction or indeed literature. So it’s, documentaries , news and sport on the Box of which there is more than enough to keep me interested.
One documentary I can recommend is The Street on Amazon Prime. A look at the working class community who live on Hoxton street,N1 and the effect on their lives of gentrification and austerity etc. Sponsored by the Arts Council .
I lived and worked in the area for a good 18 years and the change was quite something from then to now and indeed how the spread continues East and North.

I'll check that out thanks, Keith.
 
Having read all of the books and watched both series, I disagree.

The books are equally as enjoyable as the tv series! Good news that series 3 and 4 have now been confirmed.
 
Just catching up on The Last of Us. Really superb. Great cast. Very much in the same vein as The Road. Dark but with a deep humanity at its core. Oh and lots of mushroom zombies.

Also saw Avatar II at last. At the IMAX in Waterloo. As a technical marvel it is pretty unsurpassed. The 3D is so extraordinary I really did not understand how it could be done. The first Avatar was a marvel (technically) but this takes things to a totally new place. Wow. I mean the story was pretty average but the three hours flew by.

We watched Slow Horses and as many have said it's excellent. Fran got me the books so I'm also working my way through them.
 
The Elephant Whisperers (which won an Oscar earlier today) is a beautifully shot documentary about a couple raising orphaned elephants in Tamil Nadu. It has the same cathartic appeal as last year's Truffle Hunters. 10/10
(On Netflix)
 
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