Views on Musar 2011?

Discussion in 'UK Wine Forum' started by Otto Nieminen, Nov 6, 2018.

  1. I see the red Musar 2011 just came available here. Anyone tried it yet? I of course will but only in a week or so (broke until payday like all millennials! :D ). How is it?
     
  2. Tasted this in March.
    2011 Chateau Musar - Lebanon, Bekaa Valley (25/03/2018)
    Deep garnet, bricking at rim; gracious. suave, engaging; smooth tannins, tame, dense, satin-like texture. Drinking well, concentrated but all too polished. (89 pts.)
     
    Otto Nieminen likes this.
  3. Guess I must have tried it at LIWF, but damned if I can remember much about it... Suspect it can't have been sock-removing stuff. I shall endeavour to find out! I see TWS list it, so might get a few there.
     
    Otto Nieminen likes this.
  4. Ok, so it was delivered today and so I opened one. Corked!

    Still, five more...
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2018 at 8:48 PM
  5. Oh no. That's a shame. Pay day tomorrow so I'll probably go buy one. Is that too decadent a choice for a normal Wednesday considering they cost 40€ here? :D
     
  6. Second one is fine....

    This is a pretty concentrated wiine. Reminds me of New World Shiraz/Cabernet with a jewel-like clarity. Very little Musarishness at the moment, but let’s give it some time.
     
    Otto Nieminen likes this.
  7. Know what you mean.
     
  8. So it's pretty expressive even just when opened?
     
  9. Interesting question! I feel that it is quite expressive simply in terms of its impact and intensity, but shows little Musar charm and subtlety. But one should not read too much into this either way...
     
  10. A little bit of volatility and shoe polish now slipping into the nose (tiny by Musar standards). Hints of Parma ham/Iberico also. Quite enticing now.
    The palate also loosening up a little. Pretty tannic for a Musar. Quite reductive/acidic in style - yoghurt & blueberries. Actually quite Nebbiolo-like now that the blackcurrant has subsided. Barbaresco or Langhe Nebbiolo.
     
  11. So seems pretty normal for recentish Musars in that the VA and shite won't show for quite a while. But the good news is that e.g. 2009 is becoming pretty decently volatile already (tried a glass today and it sure cleared up my sinuses from the remnants of this man flu :D ). Musar always seems to start out clean and becomes a delight with age.
     
    Alex Lake likes this.
  12. Had a 2000 at the weekend. The VA was there but for me, at an acceptable level that made the wine more interesting.
     
  13. OK, so day 2...

    There's a baked/stewed element showing now, and yet the overall impression is of tightness and inscrutability. Tannins are in charge here. Not Musar's charming self, and actually a touch grumpy, as though it's being picked before its time. Yes, there's quality, but the best is clearly yet to come from this. I stick to my Piedmont Nebbiolo character comparison.
     
    Mark Carrington likes this.
  14. You should get a decanting funnel with a sieve, Alex :eek:
     
    Alex Lake likes this.
  15. Maybe the old regime's absence can be tasted.
     
  16. Ok, I've been drinking a bottle of this over the last couple days. I kind of see where Alex is coming from with the Nebbiolo comparison. But that tannic sensation in a very young Musar has been pretty normal IMO in many vintages - even ones that are becoming more like a proper stinky Musar now. From my memory of drinking Musar the past ten years or so, they have been more tannin and fruit driven when released but fairly quickly turn to the acid and fun funk driven ones I like. And often this metamorphosis happens in just a couple years. So my take on this is that it's a good but not great modern Musar. I suspect, given how past vintages have turned out, that a couple years will turn it all fun and funky (though who knows if modern Musars will ever be properly stinky again).
     
    Alex Lake likes this.
  17. Yup, although I would say that 11 is more tannic than 10 ever was. I'm sure it will soften with a little age, too.
     

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