Wine Style:
Country:
Region:
Price:
Score:
Notes per page:

Displaying results 10 - 20 of 22

(2017) The Cabernet component comes from vines planted in 1958 according to the back label, in a powerful red with lots of spice, pepper and bold black fruit, a hint of menthol and balsam too. In the mouth the fruit is sweet and rich, quite bright and not overripe or Porty, the tannins slightly rustic slightly and, like the Chardonnay, fairly abrupt acidity that for me is just not quite smoothly integrated.
(2017) GSM - Grenache, Syrah, Mourvèdre - is a classic blend not only of the Rhône Valley, but of McLaren Vale in South Australia. There's a lovely ripeness and roundness of black fruit on the nose - not jammy, but full and juicy, with a hint of pepper and spice. In the mouth the dry, fresh, slightly ashy character is offset beautifully by blackcurrant pastille fruit. A nice weight of spicy tannin and freshening acidity sets the whole, easy drinking barbecue-friendly style very nicely.
(2017) Alongside Grenache, Mataro - aka Mourvèdre - is now stealing a little bit of the limelight from Syrah in McLaren Vale. This has quite a similar nose to the GSM blend, a little bit of raspberry/strawberry lift to the fruit. In the mouth the spice and savoury richness of the fruit is good, a bit of chewy tannin and plum skin character, the sweetness of the fruit again nicely balanced by the acidity.
(2016) Grenache, Shiraz and Mataro (aka Mourvèdre) is the blend in a wine that's more earthy, spicy and plummy than the Shiraz from New South Wales, with a nicely savoury but fruity palate that retains juiciness and balance thanks to the ripe tannins and good acidity. This wine has moved on to the 2014 vintage at time of writing.
(2012) >From the relatively cool Adelaide Hills, often the source of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, this lightly-oaked Merlot has cedar and spice on the nose, a touch of lifted green herbs and floral notes, and juicy plum fruit. The palate is fairly lean in style, despite a fairly hefty 14.5% alcohol, as grippy tannins and acidity, and a certain spiciness, are set against the fruit. There's spice again in the finish in a wine that doesn't fall into the soft and soppy Merlot trap, and which has the structure and serious edge to make it a fine match with lamb or venison.
(2012) >From the relatively cool Adelaide Hills, often the source of Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, this lightly-oaked Merlot has cedar and spice on the nose, a touch of lifted green herbs and floral notes, and juicy plum fruit. The palate is fairly lean in style, despite a fairly hefty 14.5% alcohol, as grippy tannins and acidity, and a certain spiciness, are set against the fruit. There's spice again in the finish in a wine that doesn't fall into the soft and soppy Merlot trap, and which has the structure and serious edge to make it a fine match with lamb or venison.
(2012) >From dry farmed and seriously elderly bush vines (80 to 100 years old), this 14.5% ABV red was aged only in older oak barrels in order not to overwhelm the aromatics. The nose does have a very appealing, lifted and light nose of cherry, kirsch and wild, herb-strewn hillsides - very Roussillon in many way. On the palate it is medium-bodied but has great concentration. The fat black fruit fills the mid-palate, but there's a twist of liquorice and a firm, charcoally bite too with powerful spice to the tannins and a crunch to the acidity that leaves it big and slightly hot in the finish, but full of personality.
(2011) 14.5%. Clare Valley. Typically big, creamy, vanilla and cream nose with lots of cherry-edged, dark bramble fruit. Big and very, very sweet fruit on the palate, which floods across the tongue with lots of keen black fruit, all given a bit of a gamy, robust earthy and spicy edge. Loads of flavour here, that little crisp cherry-skin edge adding nice freshness into the finish.
(2010) There's a soft, vanilla and earthy spice warmth to this wine, with deep, cassis and blueberry fruit. On the palate a rush of that intense, sweet-edged but bittersweet fruit, with black cherry skin bite and plenty of crisp acidity. In fact, along with dry tannins, this is perhaps just a shade aggressive in the finish - but that's always preferable in Merlot to over-sweetness or lack of bite.
Displaying results 10 - 20 of 22