(2021) Stressing its natural credentials, this is fermented with wild yeasts from old vine fruit, not organic, but sustainably farmed. The nose is peachy-creamy with a hint of lemon meringue pie, but the wild yeast does give that little bready, lightly spicy note too. In the mouth it has a really nice texture, a little bit of grip, and that downy peach character is buttressed by firm salts and lemons acidity, into a decent length of finish. Very easy to sip, yet has a bit of real character too. Watch my video review for more information.
(2020) A late picked wine, Botrytis-affected, made from the uniquely Australian variety, Taminga, bred to retain acidity in hot conditions, and found to be very susceptible to Botrytis, thus suitable for making such inexpensive sweet wines. Honey, glycerine and a wisp of barely sugar on the nose, bold citrus and some floral aromas, are all very inviting. In the mouth it has some weight and lusciousness, the fruit between juicy nectarine and orange, more honey, and while it doesn't have the complexity or finesse of something like the Disznókő Tokaji also reviewed, it is balanced by good lemony acidity and delivers a helluva lot for the modest price. Price for 37.5cl
(2020) Naturally fermented with wild yeasts in a gently oxidative style, this blend of 50% Viognier, 29% Hárslevelu, 13% Sauvignon Blanc and 8% Semillon is aged on the lees in 500-litre French oak for just four months. It's a lovely, gossamer-light style, the oak adding little more than a sheet of almond over pristine, nutty orchard fruit, melon skins and lemon rind. Good sweetness and juiciness comes through on the palate, with plenty of fruit, but there's that lighter, clear, balanced and fresh acidity, and the natural ferment dry and nutty/herby character. Along with its medium body, that gives this an airy quality too. Watch the video for more information and food-matching suggestions.
(2020) From vines that are over 70 years old, farmed organically at altitude in the Bekaa Valley, Domaine de Tourelles adopt a very much 'hands off' approach with this wine, fermenting with indigenous yeasts in their traditional concrete vats, the wine not seeing any oak. That makes for a deep crimson purple wine with an explosively aromatic nose of crushed black berries, truffle and pepper, the sleek vinous quality also suggesting concentration. In the mouth that holds true: the intensity matched by the ripe cherry, plum and blackberry depth of sweet fruit, tannins like silk and the acid balancing in a very natural and gastronomic way. A lovely wine this, available in many independents - use our wine-searcher link. Watch the video for more information and food-matching ideas.
(2017) This Blanc de Noirs sourced only from Grands and Premieres Cru villages spent some nine years slowly developing in Gosset's cellars. Bottled with only 5g/l of residual sugar, and made from 100% Pinot Noir, it has a burnished light gold colour and immediately involving aromas: it is meaty and dense, with pastry notes and lemon, but there's a sense of grip and concentration too. In the mouth it is a glorious mouthful of Champagne: concentrated, searingly intense, yet shimmering with light and elegance. A delicate, featherweight mousse and fine, long acid structure sees to that, the sheer weight of the initial attack tapering beautifully to a crisp, focused and precise finish.
(2016) Serious bangs per buck in this excellent, and now six-year-old wine from the newly trendy Bierzo region of northwest Spain. It has a bit of earth and plummy richness and roundness, suffused with wild berries but a hint of smoky minerals too. It has a nice sheen of supporting oak to the fresh but full fruit on the palate, where the juicy and crunchy vitality is perfectly poised.
(2016) I detect a little creamy oak influence (or is it just a richness from lees ageing perhaps?), but it is aromatic with orange and crisp autumn apple tones, a hint of nuttiness then juicy on the palate, a fresh core of lemony acidity, melon and more tangy citrus in the dry, refreshing finish.
(2014) Launched recently, this all-Chardonnay cuvée is sourced from the Montagne de Reims as well as top villages of the Côte des Blancs. Malolactic is blocked, the dosage is only 7g/l, but the wine does rest on the lees for four years before disgorgement. This is in Gosset's more open, rich and nicely oxidative style, with lots of bruised fruit and nutty notes and a formidable orange-fruit intensity. Delightful freshness and zip on the palate, slicing through the finish with citrus and clean, mineral and apple intensity but real finesse too.
(2014) The Rose is composed of 60% Chardonnay and 40% Pinot Noir, with the addition of 7% of red Pinot Noir from Bouzy and Ambonnay in a rosé made by 'assemblage' rather than the skin contact method of 'saignée'. It spends four years on the lees before disgorgement. What a lovely, bold raspberry and softer strawberry fruit it presents on the nose, with a hint of Pinot earthiness and truffle and a little yeasty note. There's a nicely drying nip of tannin on the palate, but lots of Pinot character with truffle and soft red berries, and fine balancing acidity.
(2014) Célébris is sourced from top Grand Cru villages, a blend of slightly more Chardonnay than Pinot Noir (52% as opposed to 48%). It is Extra Brut with only 5g/l dosage and once again, malolactic fermentation was blocked. From one of Champagne's greatest vintages, this has a bold golden colour and is immediately tight and fantastically mineral on the nose. There are hints of toffee and a lovely lime and pear-skin richness giving this a powerful aromatic character. It is massively concentrated and indeed powerful on the palate. It's a young wine with huge intensity, tight and appley fruit. but shimmering length and such cool precision. It is steely, almost like a Grand Cru Chablis, with such beautiful length and balance that it can be admired now, but will undoubtedly improve with cellaring.