(2020) Though part of the Doctors' low-alcohol range, this is farmed conventionally - it's the unconverted 30-odd grammes of residual sugar that give the 9% alcohol and lovely balance. A portion from clay in Brancott, the rest from Wairau greywacke stones. Lovely floral notes, ringer for Mosel Riesling, with delicious fruit and a sherbetty brightness and pure apple acidity, a touch of phenolic grip just in on the edges.
(2020) Ripe pear and passion fruit, lots of pear juice clarity and good acidity, lots of pear and a touch of sugar to sweeten. Price and stockist for the previous vintage at time of review.
(2020) Sourced from vineyards across the properties, there's an appealing, light aromatic here, lightly ashy and perfumed, The fruit so juicy and cherryish. The fragrance keeps coming through, onto a spicy fruit character, the tannins quite silky, the acidity cherryish and ripe, and again that little bit of spice and herbal tones too.
(2020) An unusual white, made from Pinot Noir given minimal skin contact, so it has the faintest tinge of copper to the colour. A lovely nose, with crispness and crunch, a touch of yeastiness and plenty of crunchy apple fruit, a touch of zesty orange. Nice mouthfeel, a little sweetness, but the freshness and lemony acidity comes through.
(2020) The label states this is "certified 21 years old", though there's a good chance some of the components in the blend are even older. It's a fabulous fortified wine, mellowed by those two decades plus in barrels, but with a cut and orange zest brightness that is rarely found in similar European styles. There is a depth of cappucino, chocolate and rum-soaked raisins on the nose and palate, and a little volatile lift. That heart-warming fruitcake richness, sweetness and walnutty sheen of age is all there on the palate in a striking and delicious wine. Fabulous stuff, price for a 50cl bottle. Watch the video for more information and food-matching ideas.
(2020) A blend of 40% Cabernet Sauvignon, 40% Syrah, 15% Carignan and 5% Cinsault, this is fermented with native yeasts and made in concrete vats, unflitered and unfined to give what Tourelles describe as "A true expression of the Bekaa Valley." There's an honest, rustic authenicity about it, plum and cherry fruit, damp earth, a suggestion of briar wood and herbs. In the mouth the sweet ripeness of the fruit is striking, a big and bountiful plateful of black cherries and summer berries, but those firm tannins, good juicy acids and a bit of serious, sinewy structure give it some food-friendly heft and probably fair longevity too. Watch the video for more information and food-matching ideas. Quite widely available.
(2019) A Pinot Noir-dominated blend with Chardonnay and Pinot Meunier, this is aged on the lees for up to three years.Tasmania truly is Australia's darling for sparkling wine production, with one of its coolest climates. This traditional method fizz (or Méthode Tasmanoise as they would have it) has a very pale, delicate colour and nose that balances rosy red apples and a summer pudding berry fruit. On the palate it is straightforward and the fruit drives it, but the acid really is well-balanced and the dry finish where around 10g/l of dosage means it is quite soft and approachable.  
(2019) Paler and more delicate colour, rather more raisin and dried fig aromas, smokiness and tobacco. Immediately more luxurious, a velvet texture and pure, sweet, the luscious plump fruit and nuttiness giving complexity and richness against the acidity. Fabulous.
(2019) A little more caramel and light dustiness, walnut husks and dry in character. The palate has that intensity ramped up slightly, but it's a lovely bitter orange tang of acidity. Long and so intense.
(2019) The 2015 edition of Seveb Springs lightly-oaked Chardonnay is a really good one I must say, nutty and gently toasty notes atop generous tropical fruit, but there's a hint of a steelier character of cooler orchard fruits too. In the mouth it is expansive and ripe, but far from over-blown, the juiciness of the acidity and a salty lick of minerality off-setting the creamy depth of fruit.