(2020) Mâcon-Villages is a white Burgundy appellation from the southerly Mâconnais, a relatively warm region of vineyards close to the border with Beaujolais. Unoaked (or only very lightly oaked?) it's a lovely poised style of Chardonnay, not without ripeness and sweetness of fruit, but fresh, crisp and really quite elegant. There is some weight and richness to the texture, but the dry apple acidity in the finish leaves it food-friendly, mouth-watering, and very good value. Watch the video for more information and food matching ideas.
(2020) This is an outstanding Burgundy from a single vineyard on Pouilly-Fuissé's most famed terroir, the hill of Vergisson. Fermented and aged in oak, it is absolutely not a shrinking violet, a confident and bold white Burgundy with lashings of creamy, spicy oak, plenty of bold apricot and citrus fruit to balance, and yet an underlying streak of chalky, mineral freshness. In the mouth a great thrust of Seville orange and lemon gives a bittersweet tang, but the toast and creaminess of the oak and again that chalkiness of acidity extends the finish. Terrific.
(2020) Another delightful Premier Cru from Domaine Fourrey, this from the Côte de Léchet is in a creamier, more approachable style, less austere than some but that's far from saying it is at all Chablis, or anything other than an authentic, expressive wine. A touch of fig and apricot joins the salt-streaked apple on the nose, then the palate has that quite creamy, quite opulent character, stone fruits and pear, then the pin-point core of this wine; it's mineral and cool citrus acidity, quietly, efficiently extends the finish, giving this a lovely, tapering quality.
(2020) Sited next door to the most famous Grands Crus, Mont de Milieu is another prime 1er Cru site, and this beautifully ripe and expressive wine opens showing a touch of nuttiness, but much more juicy and creamy apple and stone fruit, just a background susggestion of salty, stony minerals. In the mouth it has Fourrey's hallmark style, which is fullness and supple fruit creaminess, but tensioned and etched by the terroir minerality. Juicy again, with citrus, but long and a delightful style showing both elegance and finesse and a bit of powerful intensity and structure.
(2020) Old fashioned in its way, this is light (12.5% abv), subtle Pinot Noir with a touch of chestnutty, autumnal warmth and a red fruit profile. In the mouth the tannins and acidity give this firmness, arguably a slightly lean quality, but that savouriness with a hint of sour orange and firm, small red berries is also its appeal. A 'proper Pinot', or rather, 'proper Burgundy' at the entry level, with a certain briary, stalky austerity.
(2020) This bottle was opened three weeks pior to re-tasting, as an experiment to see how well a wine preservation system called 'Repour' would maintain the condition of the wine. Read about Repour here. As suggested by Repour, I uncorked this three-week-old bottle to allow it to 'breathe' after its time with oxygen excluded from the wine. There was no hint of oxidation to colour or aroma, the wine seemingly very much the same as my initial tasting. In the mouth perhaps just a touch softer than previously, a touch more smoky bacon and grilled quality, but otherwise the wine was surprisingly fresh, the tannin and acid structure identical, and the overall enjoyment level the same, if not marginally improved. The Repour system certainly seemed to have avoided oxidation of the wine, and to have preserved its essential character extremely well.
(2020) Vaillons is often one of my favourite Premier Crus of Chablis, this coming from just two parcels of vines on the famous Kimmeridgian soils. It's a lovely style - relatively soft aromatically, with a certain succlence and ripeness to the fruit and just subtle flint and herbal notes. The underlying terroir minerality is there on the palate, super-fresh and riven with cleansing minerality, and yet that succulence is there again, the mid-palate acid core restraining a burgeoning fruit ripeness to lovely, long-finishing effect. £17.99 by the mixed six. Watch the video for more information and food-matching ideas.
(2020) From a single vineyard in the Côte de Nuits Fixin appellation, vinified in oak fourdres and aged in barriques, this has a medium-deep colour and, as always with this producer, delightful aromatics where those floral and lifted, almost camphor like notes meld beautifully with berry fruit and subtle oak spices. There is earthiness and honesty here. In the mouth the sweetness and pulpy textural weight of the fruit is a treat, the acid and tannin axis sharpening things up but never, ever dominating: it stays supple and fruity, spicy too, into a long, fresh finish. Seriously lovely stuff. £29.99 as part of a mixed six.
(2020) White Côte de Nuits Villages is relatively rare, and indeed only two barrels of this fine Chardonnay sourced from vineyards in Fixin. Fermented in wooden foudres and aged one year in barrique, it has a Brazil nut  opulence on the nose, quite Meursault-like, buttery, the palate brimming with ripe fruit, succulent pear and Ogen melon, very juicy, and a beautifully balanced white Burgundy with texture and charm to spare, but the cleansing acidity is framing everything very elegantly. £24.50 as part of a mixed six.
(2020) Just like the white wines, Pierre Bourée only vinifies his red wine in oak vats and ages in barrel. This Gevrey is classic stuff, quite a pale ruby colour and offering a nose that is distinctly and attractively fruity - red berries and cherry - but with such lovely and complex counterpoints of violet and old roses, hints of truffle and game, and a dusting of vanilla. On the palate it strikes a genuinely lovely balance between that fruit concentration and more ethereal, mineral and cherry-skin acid edges, a hint of coffee and truffle again in the finish. Quite firm, quite serious, and a terrific village wine that is surely capable of a decade of cellaring. £44.99 by the mixed six.