(2020) Just like the white wines, Pierre Bourée only vinifies his red wine in oak vats and ages in barrel. This Gevrey is classic stuff, quite a pale ruby colour and offering a nose that is distinctly and attractively fruity - red berries and cherry - but with such lovely and complex counterpoints of violet and old roses, hints of truffle and game, and a dusting of vanilla. On the palate it strikes a genuinely lovely balance between that fruit concentration and more ethereal, mineral and cherry-skin acid edges, a hint of coffee and truffle again in the finish. Quite firm, quite serious, and a terrific village wine that is surely capable of a decade of cellaring. £44.99 by the mixed six.
(2020) What a delightful nose on this village Puligny, vinified and matured in oak barrels for 14 months. There is oak, but it is fragrant and creamy, floral edges and hint so exotic spices rather than anything too obvious, with a gossamer fruit quality beneath; floral-edged stone fruits and crisp pear. In the mouth, nuttiness and Cox's pippin apples, very good acidity in a fine lime and mineral line that runs through the buttery ripeness and oak toastiness into the finish. Mixed six price is £44.99
(2019) Pinot Noir really is 'Vieilles Vignes' for this wine, with an average vine age of 50 years. Aged 16 months in barrel and coming from a very good vintage, there is solidity and concentration here, but no lack of charm, as indeed the perfume of the wine is lovely, suggestions of old roses and violet, a touch of red liquorice and composed berry fruit. In the mouth this has some weight and again, obvious concentration, there is a nice rasp of plum-skin tannin and acidity, but good fruit sweetness, the dry finish still tannic and youthful, but finishing on fruit and tangy acidity. Should develop nicely over the next decade. Note the price and stockist given at time of review are for the 2015 vintage.
(2019) Even in this Bourgogne Pinot, the average vine age is 45 years. The wine had a "light barrel treatment." The colour is pale garnet, the nose offering briar and brushwood, some rose hip and delicate cherryish fruit. The pure, sweet, ripeness of the fruit as it strikes the palate is remarkable, a silky, almost confiture red berry fruit, but some more earthy and a savoury acid edge cuts through, tannin and a bit of spice too, in a very good and quite complex Bourgogne of high qualty.
(2019) Like the Bourgogne Pinot, the oak treatment here is very light, and the vines are old again, on average 40 years old. It has a creamy and lightly nutty nose, a touch of almond or oatmeal to ripe, mellow apple fruit. On the palate the acidity gives tension and freshness, the oak a little nutty underpinning, but the savoury and sweet fruit on the mid-palate is very moreish and approachable, in a lovely Chardonnay similar to good examples from the Mâconnaise perhaps.
(2019) Les Bas Liards is a lieux-dit, a named parcel of vines within the village of Savigny-lès-Beaune, in this case 46-year-old vines and fermented in open-top fermenters with partial whole bunches before a year in second-fill oak. There's a ripeness here, a touch of blackcurrant and kirsch, and a woody twang of something briary and spicy. Quite an exotic background note of Sandalwood too, a touch of earthiness, in a complex picture. The palate has a clear, pure juiciness of fruit, nimble and sprightly due to the crisp and tangy acids and neatly-framed tannins. It is mouth-filling nevertheless with its rounded mid-palate fruit, and satisfyingly long finish.
(2019) We rarely see Aligoté - Burgundy's 'other' white grape - on the shelves very often, and that's a great pity when it is as delicious as this. With only 12% alcohol I guess it was picked fairly early, and that has given it terrific vim and vigour, despite a certain creamy leesiness on the nose and a generous breadth of fruit on the palate. But it tightens up smartly, saline and citrus peel pushing through, into a long and balanced finish in a very moreish wine - especially with richer seafood dishes, fish pies and the like.
(2019) Louis Jadot is one of the great names of Burgundy, producing wines from terroirs throughout the region, up to and including some of the best Grands Crus. This Pinot Noir is sourced from vineyards across Burgundy and a proportion is aged in barrel, whilst part is aged in tank to retain its fruity freshness and approachability. On the nose it is crammed with berry fruit, but also that authentic Burgundian earthiness, with hints of rhubarb and beetroot, as well as a gently smoky spice. In the mouth there's copious sweet fruit, but the elegant tannins and brisk acidity give it definition and energy. It's a lovely, less expensive red Burgundy, on sale quite widely at around £17, but with the retailer below at just £12. Watch the video for more information and food matching ideas. Footnote: I chose this wine as my Wine of the Week because an online retailer was offering it at just £12 per bottle. However, one of my visitors ordered the wine immediately and a different vintage - the 2016 - arrived. I have not tasted the 2016, so cannot vouch for it.
(2019) Last tasted over a decade ago, this now has a fair amount of amber on the rim and is pale and transluscent. The immediate aroma is of damp woodland undergrowth and fresh-picked truffle, earthy and lightly spiced, the red berry fruitiness sits elegantly beneath. In the mouth the concentration of sweet, ripe flavour surprises. There's lightness and a floating, gossamer character to this, the fruit so silky and joyously sweet, yet racing and delicate, touches of rose-hip and pulpy strawberry to a much grippier, more savoury liquorice and edive bite, which adds a lovely sense of bittersweetness. It has simply huge length, the precision and clarity of the fruit driving, always driving, but the resolved tannins and wonderful acid balance extending the finish. An outstanding wine by absolutely any measure, and although now prohibitively expensive, it joins the list of my greatest Burgundy experiences.
(2019) An interesting wine from the Louis Latour company, who are based in Burgundy but who have extensive vineyard holdings in Beaujolais just further south. This comes from the heart of the Beaujolais region, but it is not Beaujolais but 'Coteaux Bourgignons', because the wine is made from 100% Pinot Noir, which has had minimal exposure to oak, but which comes from chalk and limestone soils. It has terrific lift and buouyancy, violet florals and cherry leap from the glass, with a nice undercurrent of soft, truffly Pinot character. In the mouth it is savoury with plenty of tang from sour orange and cherry again, good tannins and plenty of sappy character to set against that core of sweet fruit. Watch the video for more information and food-matching suggestions.