(2020) A delightful, dry Côtes de Provence rosé that's mostly Grenache with 25% Cinsault, 8% Syrah and 7% Carignan, the nose is crammed with small red berry fruits, cranberry and redcurrants, a touch of lemon rind too. Some lees contact in tank lends texture on the palate, and it is super dry and tangy-fresh, a real sense of citrus juiciness is mouth-watering, in a delicious and gastronomic rosé perfect with a salad Niçoise or seabass or bream. Watch the video for more information.
(2020) A certified organic Provence rosé for less than £7.00 is an intriguing prospect, but I confess this wasn't one of my favourites from this small selection. A moderately pale colour, the nose offers small red berries and a faint touch of the lavender or thyme that one one hopes for, but the palate was much sweeter than would be typical, and that threw the wine's slight sense of dilution into sharp relief. I don't know how much residual sugar this has, but though quaffable enough it didn't push the bone-dry Provençal buttons that I personally look for.
(2020) From 30-year-old vines in Provence, 17,000 bottles were produced in this first commercial vintage. Much more suave and smoothly solid aromatically than the Pierres Dorées, deep scents of plum and cherry, spices and tobacco, a little chestnut earthiness. Very different indeed from the wine from Beaujolais. In the mouth there is much more structure here, firm grip from the tannins, good lively acidity, but the fruit does retain that little bit of crunch that keeps it fresh. A more substantial wine, spicy and savoury, a counterpoint to the Pierres Dorées elegant charms.
(2020) Another stylish bottle for this blend of Syrah, Grenache and a little of the white variety, Rolle. Pale in colour, and an intense nose of lime peel, small red fruits and something quite mineral and concentrated, maybe melon skins. In the mouth again there is an impressive level of fruit concentration here, more intense and powerful than many Provence rosés, but it does not lack clarity or finesse, or fresh acidity. Very good. Price and stockist quoted at time of review is for the previous vintage.
(2020) Come hither charms for this soft, pulpy red-fruited Provence pink, aromas of strawberry sunde, sherbet and watermelon and an appealing, very easy drinking palate with balanced acidity and a gentle finish. No UK retail listing at time of review.
(2020) An absolutely delightful wine, predominatnly Syrah with 20% Mourvèdre and 10% of the white grape, Vermentino, it is made from a selection of the best grapes from their best vineyards near Aix-en-Provence. The Mourvèdre component sees barrel maturation. Such an explosively fruity nose, strawberry and burstingly ripe peach, flowers and a fine salty/earthy note too. In the mouth the fruit is decisive and keen, small redcurrant berries and raspberry, but that keen, mouth-watering edge of salts and lemon giving great thrust and decisive tension. Terrific rosé. No UK stockists at time of review.
(2020) Lots of zip and appealing brightness to this, a bit of lipsticky lift and bright red summer fruits: rosehips, strawberry and watermelon. In the mouth a nicely balanced wine, with that pulpy fresh red fruit tanginess persisting, a nice core of lemony acidity and pleasing dry, textured finish.
(2020) From an estate owned by Bernard Magrez, whose portfoilio of properties includes Pape Clément, this Côtes de Provence Rosé marches to quite a different beat, from vines averaging 41 years of age and with a stated alcohol of 14.5% abv. That translates into a wine that is neither overripe nor particularly deeply coloured, but which has an intrinsic subtle power and intensity. Good, elegant and lifted red fruit notes dominate, but the palate has a real mineral salts streak on acidity along with cleansing citrus, for a concentrated and slightly more serious take on the style.
(2020) From an estate owned by Scottish industrialist Sir David Murray, this is a Cinsault and Grenache-led blend from Varois en Provence, where 350-metres of altitude provide relatively cool conditions and clay and limestone soils some added freshness. It is elegant and perfumed, some floral notes and cherry fruit, a softer hint of pulpy strawberry too. In the mouth red fruits but a keen acid framework that adds a cleansing, quite pithy lemon freshness too. Stylish and good value.
(2020) The very minimalist packaging of this Provence rosé is explained by the eco-conscious brand behind it: made by Château Pigoudet, like all Sea Change wines each bottle purchased results in a donation to marine conservation charities to fight plastic pollution. No plastics are used, the bottle coming without a capsule, its label made from plant cellulose. The wine is suitably pale in colour and has a very vibrant, and very appealing nose, with plenty of zestiness but also a vivacious fruit salad character with juicy mango and peach to the fore. In the mouth there's a touch of confectionary tutti-frutti character, but that juicy peach dominates and the  balance really is very good, a crisp citrus freshness leaving the finish dry and moreish. The price drops to £13.99 for a mix of six Sea Change wines.