(2018) This rosé from the island of Evia is made from 100% Mavrokoudoura, a new variety for me, and is a medium- to pale-coloured peachy-pink with intriguing aromatics that are quite ripe and lychee, or passion fruit-like, but something stony and gravelly too. In the mouth it is bone dry and grippy, a big grapefruity hit of sour citrus and acidity, this has mouth-watering presence, some pulpy strawberry character soon swept along in the acidity of the finish. Different, and plenty of personality here.
(2018) The 2015 vintage of this delightful rosé made my 'Wine of the Week', and this 2017 follows in the same vein of pale, lacework-light character from one of Turkey's best grape varieties. Delicate passion fruit and underripe white strawberries, a lovely finish that also balances between sweet and downy peach and raspberry, and its decisive core of acidity to give excellent freshness and tang. Delightful.
(2018) From the Languedoc, Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault, Carignan, Merlot and Mourvèdre in the mix for a medium-pale rosé, with a fairly simple and straightforward strawberry and raspberry fruit, the palate fruity and generous, a little briary leafiness and a slightly astringent quality to the acidity stopping it a little short, but keeping it fresh.
(2018) From the super-impressive Alpha Estate in Greek Macedonia, this has the delicate Provençal colour and character, spices, small hard red berries and a touch of watermelon. Made by running off some juice from the red wine cuvée,  'Hedgehog', after two hours in the press, it has a nice salty mineral freshness. Long and nicely done.
(2018) A blend of Grenache and Cinsault, and clearly mimicking the Provence style, this is a Vin de France, the classification that allows cross-regional blending of grapes. Pale and fairly neutral in aroma, there's a delicate, light peach and red fruit quality and a fairly obvious dollop of residual sugar. There's a sense of this being a very 'made' wine, but the recipe is successful enough to justify the £6.99 'mixed six' price in Majestic if it sounds like your cup of tea.
(2018) From the traditional rosé stronghold of Tavel, very close to Châteauneuf-du-Pape, this is a deeply-coloured and quite serious pink made from Grenache and Syrah that’s so unlike the in-vogue pale Provençal style, yet is quite marvellous: crammed with cherry and ripe red berries, there’s a creaminess to the flavour and texture and the little nip of tannin and focused acidity give it structure and length too. Excellent with an Italian fennel sausage casserole perhaps? On offer at time of review for £11.75.
(2018) A lovely blend of 60% Grenache with Syrah from vineyards at 300-400m altitude, planted on clay and limestone soils, this is a most delicate and dry rosé, passion fruit and watermelon aromas touching into the tropical, a saline hint in the background. In the mouth that sweep of peach and grapefruit fresh but full fruit meets more delicate rose-hip, a lovely tart acid background pushing out the finish to a fine point.
(2018) Made from Syrah (60%), with Grenache (35%) and Cinsault (5%), this is more robustly fruity than the 'Pure' bottling, but that's not to say it is in any way clumsy or crude. Very pale in colour, tha aromas are of lychee and raspberry, clearly more fruity than the Pure, but with a sense of breezy freshness too. On the palate the limey acid core is excellent, in a dry wine that frames the summer berry fruits with citrus, an ozoney lick of salty mineral character adding some grip in a slightly nore powerful, but delightful pink.
(2018) From the same vineyards as 'Pure' this elegantly packaged, pale wine is also a similar blend so presumably a selection of the better plots or tanks. There's a delightful icing sugar-dusted confectionery character, fruity and fresh, with a hint of raspberry and small whitecurrants. In the mouth it's pretty much bone dry again, and once more has that saline lick to the lemony acidity, the fruit quite savoury but hinting at peach and rosy red apple. Handsomely packaged, it's another lovely and delicate wine.
(2018) Though the name of the estate sounds like a not so subtle cash-in on Provence, in fact domaine de la Provenquière traces its history back almost 500 years in it's corner of the Languedoc close to Béziers. Having said that, this certainly has Provençal leanings, pale in colour, dry and fresh with only 12% alcohol, though made from the pink-skinned Pinot Gris rather than Provençal varieties. Summer berries, fragrant lemon peel and a little wisp of peach on the nose, then a dry, chalky palate with pleasingly sweet fruit, medium body and then plenty of tangy acid. Daily Drinker club members will pay £9.00 for this.