(2019) The credentials here are solid, from a vineyard adjoining the famous Miraval estate and with winemaking guided by Jean Louis Bavay, who gained his rosé expertise at the legendary Domaine Ott. It's a classic Provence pink, mostly Grenache and Cinsault along with 20% Syrah, about 8% of which is fermented oak. Maybe that gives the little hint of spice on the nose, but it's mostly driven by small red berries - cranberries, redcurrants - watermelon and rose-hips, but there's zestiness too. In the mouth it feels quite substantial, though very crisp and fresh, lots of lemony zip and vigour, a peachy softness to the fruit, but always dry, mouth-watering and food-friendly in style. A fine example of Provence Rosé at a very fair price. Free delivery on 12 bottles. Watch the video for more information and food matching ideas.
(2019) Hampton WaterI have to say upfront that everything about this Pays d'Oc blend of Grenache, Cinsault and Mourvèdre screams 'marketing' - first the ambitious price of £20 per bottle, second the striking label, 'Vinolock' glass stopper and designer bottle, and thirdly that it is made by Gérard Bertrand for a wine company launched by rock star Jon Bon Jovi and his son, Jesse - the business run by 23-year-old Jesse who studied political science and business economics. The 'Hampton' of its name is The Hamptons, and exceedingly up-market coastal playground for New York's super-rich, where the inspiration for making a rosé came to the father and son team. Following booming sales in the US, the wine has recently arrived in the UK. So is it any good? It's from the Languedoc, but pale and Provençal in style, though it has seen seen some barrel ageing which is not typical of Provence. There's a buouancy and fruity lift to the aromas, intense small berries and a limey note. In the mouth no real trace of oak, other perhaps than a richer texture than might be expected, again plenty of concentration of flavour, and a salty lick of minerality to join the pithy lemon zest acidity. It's certainly a bigger mouthful of wine than a typical Provence example, and has enough going on to justify the hype, though no doubt a bit of celebrity factor is built into the price.
(2019) This was poured from magnum. Just ramping up the almost narcotic, opium-den height and depth of incense and flowers, melding with those bloody, animal scents. This is now hitting its stride. Smooth as silk, the poise and the elegance of the tannins against the sweetness of the fruit is beguiling, in a fabulous, multi-layered wine.
(2019) Made from 100% Refosco in the Treviso area, this comes from Masi, best known for their Amarone wines, so it is not surprising to hear around 15% of this undergo appassimento (the grapes dried on straw mats) for approximately 50 days. That gives this wine an extra edge of firmness and a bit of tannic bite too, not sweetness: it has cherry and floral aromas, pretty and peachy, then that firmer edge on the palate, crisp fruit but an apple core bite and squeeze of fresh lemon, to give a clean, savoury and food-friendly finish. There's substance here to stand up to a bowl of tomatoey pasta.
(2019) The Sauvignon Gris that lies behind this pale blush wine is immediately apparent on the nose and palate; tasted blind one might have guessed Sauvignon Blanc, with its racy acidity, grapefruity tang and touches of elderflower and passion fruit. Not a remarkable rosé it's true, but distinctive and quite unusual.
(2019) Chemin des Pelèrins is label of the giant Plaimont Cooperative, a very good winery that accounts for a big majority of all Saint Mont appellation bottlings. A blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinenc and Tannat, it has a pretty pale pink colour and immediately fruity/confectionery nose. IN the mouth the pert, berry fruit and acidity continues, though for me those does finish with a slightly awkward lemony bite.
(2019) How confusing that Majestic now offers three prices for this wine, ranging from £12.99 down to £8.99, depending on how many you buy and how often you buy it. Life used to be so simple.  A pink made from Pinot Noir, it has a peachy colour and just slightly confected character on the nose. In the mouth there's some sweetness and plenty of summery fruit, to make it easy drinking (if a touch cloying for me). This is crowd-pleasing, but no £12.99's worth.
(2019) Part of the Lidl 'Wine Tour' special parcels, in stores from May 23rd 2019, who can complain about an organically certified rosé, made in the Castilla–La Mancha region of Spain, but in a thoroughly modern, pale-coloured idiom, at just £4.99. Bubblegum cherries and raspberries on the nose, fruity yet dry on the palate, a nice zesty acidity keeps it fresh in the finish and imbues enough cut to make this salad and saucisson friendly, as well as in-the-garden sippable.
(2019) From the Chardonnay and Pinot stronghold of the Adelaide Hills, a Pinot Noir rosé that is crammed with sweet and summer berry aromas and flavours. Relatively deep in colour, touches of spices and watermelon sit atop crushed strawberry sundae - Eton mess in a glass. In the mouth the sweetness of the fruit is noticeable, perhaps a touch of residual sugar too, but there is a freshening blast of clean acidity and little herbaceous hint that adds to the crispness.
(2019) Most certainly one for those who like a dollop of sweetness in their Rosé - not just ripeness, but residual sugar that puts this firmly in the 'off-dry' category. A medium pink in colour, it is all about strawberry sundae fruit on nose and palate, ripe and sweet, though the acid balance really is not at all bad, and does stop this from being cloying. Sip in the garden with its 11.5% abv, or maybe match to some strawberries touched with balsamic vinegar in a not too sweet dessert? Part of Lidl's 'Wine Tour' May 2019.