(2019) Stainless steel fermented, this is a juicy, ripe take on Sauvignon, a bit more herbaceous than the Klein Constantia, a little more weight and leesy texture too. There’s a green bean oiliness to the texture and flavour, dry, full textured and juicy.
(2019) Blend of 70% Sauvignon and Semilion made it 600l barrels, around 18% new. A small percentage is made in clay amphora. Subtle, nutty character, great crispness to the nose - crunchy apple and lemon, but a sheen of sophistication. Deliciously tangy orange and lemon fruit and acidity.
(2019) Mostly Merlot, with around 35% of the two Cabernets, matured in French oak, around 28% new, the remainder 2nd and 3rd fill. There’s a leafiness here, and earthy and lightly bloody character to the plum fruit. Bittersweet plum, chocolate and cherry with a bit of chicory bitterness adding to the gastronomic appeal. Very ripe in the mouth.
(2018) Partner to the newly-introduced Chardonnay, and also bottled with the innovative twist off cork, this is a very nicely-pitched Sauvignon, showing both grassy, herbal zing and a ripe fruit profile. Touches of lychee and mago give an exotic flair, and the acidity balances that ripe fruit nicely into the finish.
(2018) For many, the main interest in this wine might be the closure on the bottle: the innovative 'Helix', an unscrewable cork, featured on wine-pages four years ago when it was announced, but appearing on a commercially available wine in the UK for the first time - watch the video for information and a demonstration of the cork, which is also on the Sauvingnon Blanc partner to this wine. The wine itself is a nicely fresh and crunchy Chardonnay, very lightly-oaked, and focused on succulent pear and more tropical fruit, with a herbal tang and lemony-fresh acidity. It's a nice example of restrained but ripe Chardonnay, and the cork is certainly a talking point.
(2017) What a superb wine this is from Gagnard, from an organic vineyard in the Hautes-Côtes de Beaune owned by grower Caroline Lestimé. Aged for 12 to 15 months in barrel, one-third new, there is obvious nutty, creamy oak overlaying the citrus and apple, with a nice sour, cabbage nuance that adds a complex, savoury note. The palate brims with zesty fruit, but that cashew and Brazil nut character is there, and a burst of refreshing, almost tangerine or lime acidity. A delightful white Burgundy.
(2016) This wine, made from a vineyard planted in the 1990s with cuttings from the RunRig vineyards, is aged in barrels that were used for last year's RunRig. A Shiraz/Viogner co-ferment. Absolute peachy Viognier presence here, with lots of perfume and the plush black fruit coming through.  Big, chewy palate, lots of fruit concentration and black fruit skins, lots of extract and liquorice chewiness and density. Firm, firm tannins, and certainly needs time (when it's score might edge higher too).
(2016) Another determined Provence Rosé from Le Grand Cros, hefty in alcohol with its 14% yet surprisingly delicate in colour, aroma and flavour. Pale salmon-peach in colour, the nose is dry with a hint of salty minerals, apples and lemon rind. In the mouth a delicious burst of full fruitiness, citrus and red berries, all nicely proportioned and balanced with the acidity in another fine wine from the Faulkner family's estate.
(2016) A barrel sample. Again following a modern, more aromatic and Muscat style, not so much raisined character,  a more pure fruit aroma, all the florals again and even a hint of geranium leaf lift. Full of delicious, cool fruit and a warming, fudge like hint of depth and sweetness. Seems very fine indeed and promises great things.
(2016) I just love the unforced, natural concentration of this Pinot Noir from vineyards neighbouring Pommard. It's the epitome of an iron fist in a cashmere glove, as gentle bracken and cherry flavours flatter, before a stripe of intense concentration, liquorice and endive is revealed. It's core has concentrated acidity and tannins, whilst those crisp red fruit flavours and sappy, young twig freshness is energising. The opposite of blockbuster, but hugely pure and decisive, it should cellar five years+.