(2017) Made with wild foraged meadowsweet, a herb that grows by river banks. Pale gold in colour, high chamomile and - yes - meadowsweet aromas, quite interesting and inviting a sip: that reveals a medium-sweet mouthful of fairly light-bodied wine, those floral and herbal characters and a hint of bitterness in the finish. The best of the three Cairn O'Mohr wines tasted in my opinion, though wine lovers need not rush to buy.
(2017) 'Goes with Haggis' is the name, and could this get any more cliched Scottish, also with a picture of Rabbie Burns on the label. The colour is light red and the nose has an interesting herbal and nettle touch to berry fruit, certainly adding some interest that's missing in the raspberry wine. In the mouth it is drier than expected, a slightly metallic edge, but also a hint of spices and those dry autumn leaves and berries. Palatable rather than admirable for me.
(2017) Perthshire is home of the Cairn O'Mohr winery, and of Scotland's thriving soft fruit industry, so the fresh raspberries that flavour this drink certainly clock up very few food miles. It's a deep pink or light red in colour, and the aromas are of slightly generic red berries rather than singing of raspberry. In the mouth the initial sweetness of the fruit is soon swept up in acidity, in an off-dry style, but it is a pretty blunt instrument I must say.
(2017) A case of this was purchased by me maybe a decade ago, and after three of four enjoyable bottles from it, I rather forgot all about the remainder in the cellar, so it was time to try this 27-year-old sweet Chenin Blanc again. The colour is a lovely buttercup/light gold, with immediately attractive notes of honey and wild flowers, beeswax and pollen, quite complex and so inviting. On the palate it is medium-bodied but has some slippery texture and weight, and the sweetness is lovely: just as sweet as I remember it, a light honey and caramel, but dazzling freshness too. Long, with some barley sugar and excellent acidity, it's not full-on sweet, but just lovely. Drink with fruity desserts, foie-gras, or on its own.  There are actually two or three stockists of this 1990 at time of review - use wine-searcher.
(2017) The label doesn't list the varieties for this distinctly off-dry to medium-sweet Loire pink, but it's 60% Cabernet Franc with 20% each of Gamay and Grolleau. Quite pale in colour, it has a sweetie, cherry lips and red liquorice nose, some floral aspects, and a plenty of sweetness on the palate. Fruity and simple, there is decent acidity, but it is verging on a dessert wine for my palate and perhaps best matched to strawberry shortcake or similar desserts.
(2017) Would I class this as semi-sweet or fully sweet? It's probably somewhere in upper Spätlese to Auslese territory (in fact, Kevin tells me it has 38/gl of residual sugar), but is a truly glorious Riesling, brimming with sweet nectarine and mango, a definite touch of Botrytis honey and barley sugar, and a zesty touch of lime peel. It has such luscious fruit sweetness on the palate, more of that peach and apricot flesh juiciness, tropical notes, and a riveting core of grapefruit acidity. It's easy to over-mark sweeter wines, but this is incredibly well done and utterly delicious.
(2017) With 30g/l residual sugar, this was sent straight to barrel for fermentation with ambient yeast. Wooly, lanolin quality and a little waxy, with nectarine and has lots of orange and peach, and nicely balanced.
(2017) Medium-sweet perhaps with 70g/l of sugar, a vineyard block is managed specifically for this. Picked early, fermentation is stopped leaving the sugar quite high. Gently smoky and apple-scented, with an absolutely delicious shimmering freshness and lightness. Kabinett in style, with lovely balance. Price quoted is per bottle equivalent, but sold by the 12-bottle case only.
(2015) One of the great, great names of the Loire valley on superb form, this demi-sec or 'half dry' Chenin Blanc is everything that so many others of this style might aspire to. Such intriguing honeyed richness here, swirling with light smokiness and vanilla, but whilst hinting at the ripe and exotic it is the mineral and gravel notes that are adding so much more complexity. Quite luscious, the orangey brightness of the acidity playing against gorgeous ripe apple and more exotic nectarine sweetness, it is long and utterly beautiful.
(2015) We kick off the whites with an unusual 'moelleux', literally meaning 'mellow', off-dry white made from late-harvested Gros Manseng grapes in the South-west of France. With only 11.5% alcohol this is such a charming little wine, succulent with honey, nectarine and herb aromas, before the palate that is limpid and rich, but with a streaking apple acidity to balance. The winemaker suggests drinking with Comte cheese, and I'd throw Mimolet or even Parmesan into the mix too, but a delicious wine.